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Experience a Course at Yale in the Summer

Yale Summer Session combines the resources of a world-class university with the close-knit community of a liberal arts college. In our small classes, Yale Summer Session students work closely with world-renowned faculty; they also have access to the vast array of resources on campus, including the libraries, galleries, collections, and gymnasium.  Our diverse student body comes from across the U.S. and around the world.

Pin: Over 150 summer session courses are taught by Yale faculty or affiliates, offered in over 50 different disciplines, and located on Yale's historic campus in New Haven, Connecticut.

Living and studying at Yale gives students a new found appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • experience residential living on one of the most beautiful campuses in America
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Some courses have pre-requisites.  To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course.   If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students.  Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session

Pin: Course Syllabi

Please note that 2020 syllabi are being uploaded as they become available. If you do not find the 2020 syllabus for the course you are interested in, you may find the 2019 version at the link below. While there is no guarantee the information from 2019 will be the same as 2020, you may use the 2019 course syllabus to give you an idea of the general requirements and readings for the 2020 iteration.

2020 Course Syllabi

2019 Course Syllabi

Auditing

Auditing is not allowed in courses taught in New Haven or abroad. Auditing is permitted in select online courses only. Please refer to the Non-Credit Course Option/Audit for online courses.

Summer 2020 Courses

Use the search function below to view courses offered in New Haven and online this summer. 

Summer 2020 Dates

Date: Session A:
May 25 - June 26, 2020

Session B:
June 29 - July 31, 2020

Summer 2020 application is now open.

 

 

Intermediate and Advanced French II

FREN S140 (CRN: 30191)

8-week program: based on the Yale campus (New Haven, CT) for 4-weeks followed by 4-weeks in Paris, France. Second course in an intensive ""at-home-and-abroad"" program designed to perfect students' skills in understanding spoken and written French and in speaking and writing. Prepares students for further work in literary, language, and cultural studies as well as for nonacademic use of French. Prerequisite: FREN 120 (Elementary and Intermediate French II), 121 (Intermediate French) or equivalent proficiency. Must be taken in conjunction with FREN S140. Enrollment limited. Application deadline: February 15. Students are responsible for arranging travel to and from Paris and all other program expenses beyond tuition. For further details, such as program costs, prerequisites, exact dates, credits, etc., visit the program page on the Yale Study Abroad website: http://studyabroad.yale.edu/programs/intermediate-advanced-french-i-ii.

France Between Past and Present: Advanced Language Practice and Culture

FREN S154 (CRN: 30192)

5 week program: based in Paris, France. The course aims to enrich students’ knowledge of France and French society in the 21st century. Students will engage with French culture through various readings and cultural excursions that include guided walking tours, museum visits, plays, and excursions outside of Paris.  Materials include fiction and non-fiction texts, newspaper articles, films, and television clips.  Advanced-level grammar will also be reviewed.  Students will develop their capacity for defending their ideas in French both orally and in writing.

France On Screen and Off: Advanced French Conversation and Culture Through Film

FREN S164 (CRN: 30193)

5-week program: based in Paris, France. The course aims to enrich students’ knowledge of France and French society in the 21st century through the medium of film.  Cultural excursions including theater, museum visits, walking tours and weekend trips outside of Paris will complete the immersion experience and will enhance learning goals.  Materials include ten films, newspaper articles,  songs and television clips. Students will perfect their oral and written skills through debates, presentations and written essays.

Age of Cathedrals

FREN S305 (CRN: 30206)

5-week program: based in Paris, France. A study of the culture and monuments of the High Middle Ages in France, with visits to Saint Denis, Chartres, Sainte-Chapelle, Amiens, Bayeux, Reims, the Cité de l'Architecture, Cluny Museum, and discussion of accompanying historical, literary, and philosophical works by Peter Abelard, Abbot Suger, Rutebeuf, Saint Bernard, Joinville, Thibaut de Champagne, Pseudo-Dionysius, Marie de France, Jacques de Voragine, Guibert de Nogent, and the anonymous Song of Roland, Quest for the Holy Grail, fabliaux, and courtly lyric. Core consideration of the Norman Conquest of 1066, gothic architecture, urban and economic renewal, and intellectual, social, and religious life of twelfth- and thirteenth-century France. Students choose FREN, HUMS, or LITR credit. All instruction is in English. Enrollment limited. Application deadline: February 15. Students are responsible for arranging travel to and from Paris and all other program expenses beyond tuition. For further details, such as program costs, exact dates, credits, etc., visit the program page on the Yale Study Abroad website: http://studyabroad.yale.edu/programs/age-cathedrals.

Belle Époque France

FREN S369 (CRN: 30202)

5-week program: based in Paris, France. A study of important works of literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and the decorative arts in turn-of-the-century France (1870-1914). This course will acquaint students with the principal literary and artistic forms, social trends, political movements, scientific theories, and technological innovations of the Belle Époque, with visits to museums, architectural monuments, theatre, and art nouveau cafés in Paris. Principle authors: Zola, Gide, Proust, Apollinaire, Huysmans, Maupassant, Mallarmé, Colette, Alain-Fournier, Barbey d’Aurevilly, Jarry, and Feydeau. Students choose FREN, HUMS, or LITR credit. All instruction is in English. Enrollment limited. Application deadline: February 15. Students are responsible for arranging travel to and from Paris and all other program expenses beyond tuition. For further details, such as program costs, exact dates, credits, etc., visit the program page on the Yale Study Abroad website: http://studyabroad.yale.edu/programs/belle-epoque-france.

French for Reading

FREN S999E (CRN: 30169)

Online Course. Students acquire skills for reading French-language texts of any difficulty with some fluency. Study of syntax and grammar; practice in close reading and translation of texts in different genres in the humanities. Yale doctoral student tuition is funded by GSAS. Visiting student tuition: $850. Session A: May 25 - June 26.

Energy, Technology and Society

G&G S120 (CRN: 30282)

Seminar that covers the technology, use, and impact of energy on the environment, climate, security, and the economy. Emphasis on what drives people's choices and the effects of those choices. Tours of energy facilities on the Yale campus. Prerequisite: a strong background in high school physics, chemistry, and mathematics. Enrollment limited to 24 students. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session B: June 29 - July 31. (View syllabus)

Global Climate Change & the Carbon Cycle

G&G S130 (CRN: 30264)

An introductory science course for the general student interested in better understanding Earth's climate system, covering mechanisms of the carbon cycle, greenhouse gases, insolation, and weathering. Measurements of ancient climate cycles, ice age cycles, and post-industrial climate trends and causes will be discussed. Prerequisite of high school algebra. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session A: May 25 - June 26. (View syllabus)

Intro International Relations

GLBL S268E (CRN: 30325)

No description available.

The Balance of Power: Theory and Practice

GLBL S287 (CRN: 30112)

Explores the evolution of the international balance of power since the outset of the twentieth century. The causes and conduct of World Wars I and II and the Cold War, as well as the evolution of international politics since the demise of the Soviet Union. Emphasis is both analytical and historical. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session A: May 25 - June 26.

Disinformation and Democracy

GLBL S343E (CRN: 30141)

Online Course. This course explores the evolution of information warfare as a national security threat to the United States. Beginning with the KGB’s use of “active measures” during the Cold War, the course looks at how propaganda and disinformation campaigns became central to the Putin regime and how social media has facilitated their expansion and impact. Using Russia’s efforts in the 2016 election as an example, students will examine how the First Amendment places limitations on the U.S.’s ability to counter such operations in the United States and explore how strengthening critical thinking and American social capital might be effective prophylactics against these efforts. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,350. Session A: May 25 - June 26. 

Society and Politics of North Africa

GLBL S361 (CRN: 30176)

5-week program: based in Ifrane, Morocco for 4-weeks followed by 1-week in Rabat, Morocco. The Maghrib – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya – has historically been a critical frontier zone linking Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This crossroads remains strategically important with issues such as sub-Saharan and North African migration, political Islam, Arab-Berber identities, terrorism and counter-terrorism, the Sahara question, and Mediterranean trade relationships current international concerns. This program provides a thorough overview of North African history, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism, political systems and opposition, Islam in North Africa, and the Maghrib in the 21st century. Participants will also meet with local experts, interact with Moroccan university students, and be able to have a homestay with a Moroccan family.

Intermediate German I

GMAN S130 (CRN: 30194)

8-week program: based in Jena, Germany for 4-weeks followed by 4-weeks in Berlin, Germany. First course in an intensive, content-based language program that teaches linguistic skills through a variety of texts and media, with special emphasis on the culture and history of 12 German, Austrian and Swiss cities. Students spend the four weeks in Jena, a small town in the heart of Germany. The group will take a weekend trip to Munich, as well as excursions to nearby cities that can include Erfurt, Weimar, Eisenach, and Buchenwald. Students will visit museums, historical sites, cultural shows and more.

Intermediate German II

GMAN S140 (CRN: 30195)

8-week program: based in Jena, Germany for 4-weeks followed by 4-weeks in Berlin, Germany. Second course in an intensive, content-based language program that teaches linguistic skills through a variety of texts and media, with special emphasis on the culture and history of 12 German, Austrian and Swiss cities. Students spend the four weeks in Berlin. There will be excursions to museums, cultural events, and historical sites in and around Berlin in the afternoons. On weekends, the group takes trips to nearby cities, such as Leipzig or Dresden or Hamburg.  

The Logic of Dreams

GMAN S190 (CRN: 30088)

The nature, history, and possible meanings of dream experience, with reference to Sigmund Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. Works from film and literature about dreams and dreaming, as well as major texts in dream theory. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session B: June 29 - July 31.

German for Reading

GMAN S999E (CRN: 30168)

Online Course. Students acquire skills for reading German-language texts of any difficulty with some fluency. Study of syntax and grammar; practice in close reading and translation of texts in different genres in the humanities. Yale doctoral student tuition is funded by GSAS. Visiting student tuition: $850. Session B: June 29 - July 31.

American History in National Museums

HIST S125 (CRN: 30018)

An introduction to select topics in U.S. history and encourages critical, informed analysis of how those topics are currently represented by the Smithsonian. This course will focus attention on the 20th century United States, on the development of the Smithsonian as an institution, and on research and interpretive practices used by museum curators. Participants will visit and analyze how museums in Washington D.C. present national history to a diverse public. Students are also required to attend a THREE-day field trip to Washington D.C. Expenses for the trip will be covered by Yale Summer Session. Students will depart on Thursday evening at 5 p.m. If students are taking a second course in Yale Summer Session, they must choose one that does not meet on Thursday EVENINGS or on Fridays in order to participate in the trip. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,550. Session A: May 25 - June 26.

Film, Video, and American History

HIST S187 (CRN: 30075)

This course will examine the representation of American history in film and digital video through the close analysis of fiction and nonfiction features. Topics will include: the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights Era, the Cold War, Vietnam, and September 11th. Emphasis will be placed on the manner in which the past is depicted in individual films and what the choice of subjects reveals about the directors' sociopolitical moment. This course seeks to expand students' knowledge of the history of American film, culture, and society. In-class screenings will include films such as The Birth of a Nation, The Jazz Singer, Foreign Correspondent, Zero Dark Thirty, and Inglourious Basterds. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session B: June 29 - July 31.

Society and Politics of North Africa

HIST S236 (CRN: 30177)

5-week program: based in Ifrane, Morocco for 4-weeks followed by 1-week in Rabat, Morocco. The Maghrib – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya – has historically been a critical frontier zone linking Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This crossroads remains strategically important with issues such as sub-Saharan and North African migration, political Islam, Arab-Berber identities, terrorism and counter-terrorism, the Sahara question, and Mediterranean trade relationships current international concerns. This program provides a thorough overview of North African history, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism, political systems and opposition, Islam in North Africa, and the Maghrib in the 21st century. Participants will also meet with local experts, interact with Moroccan university students, and be able to have a homestay with a Moroccan family.

The Olympic Games: Ancient to Modern

HIST S242 (CRN: 30035)

Introduction to the history of the Olympic Games from antiquity to the present. The mythology of athletic events in ancient Greece and the ritual, political, and social ramifications of the actual competitions. The revival of the modern Olympic movement in 1896, the political investment of the Greek state at the time, and specific games as they illustrate the convergence of athletic cultures and sociopolitical transformations in the twentieth century. 1 Credit. Tuition $4,350. Session B: June 29 - July 31.

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