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2019 Course Listing

Yale Summer Online offers courses with a variety of subjects, distributional requirements, and class times to fit students' academic needs. This year, eleven courses are offered in the evening providing additional academic opportunity for students in the summer.  

Tip: Graduate Language Reading Courses
Online
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Date: Session A:
May 27 - June 28, 2019

Session B:
July 1 - August 2, 2019

Abnormal Psychology

Jutta Joormann

Study of the major forms of psychopathology that appear in childhood and adult life. Topics include the symptoms of mental disorders; the etiology of disorders from a variety of perspectives (psychological, biological, and sociocultural); and issues pertaining to diagnosis and treatment. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Archaeoastronomy

Michael Faison

An introduction to how celestial patterns and events were observed and interpreted up to the Copernican revolution. Ancient observatories, calendar systems, records of astronomical events, and the role of astronomical knowledge in culture. Exercises in naked-eye observation of the sky. 1 credit.

2018 Syllabus

Autism and Related Disorders

Fred Volkmar

Survey of current understandings and treatment of autism from infancy through adulthood. Topics include etiology, diagnosis and assessment, treatment and advocacy, and social neuroscience methods. Focus on ways in which research findings are integrated into diagnosis and treatment practices. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

Causes and Consequences of Corruption

Bonnie Palifka

Corruption, a manifestation of the principal-agent problem, is an obstacle to economic growth, social cohesion, and political legitimacy. Corruption occurs where fundamental institutions are weak or poorly designed, while situation-specific incentives make corruption tempting, and personal ethics are malleable. This course examines the economic, cultural, and political causes and consequences of corruption; cross-country comparisons of corruption levels; and examples of successful reforms and policies to combat corruption in government and business. For college students and beyond. Prerequisite: ECON , 110, or 115, or equivalent. 1 Credit.

2019 Syllabus

Electronic Dance Music: Fundamentals

Kathryn Alexander

The developmental history of technology in music creativity, with particular attention to the aesthetics and musical invention in the genres and repertoire of electronic dance music including house, techno, trance, jungle, drum 'n' bass, dubstep, and drum step, among others.1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Macroeconomics

Marnix Amand

An introduction to basic macroeconomic concepts and theories, such as national income accounting, theories of growth, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, banking, finance, and economic crises, with special emphasis on the recent financial crisis. Prerequisite: ECON 108, 110, 115 or equivalent. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A (CRN 30159) and Session B (CRN 30160).

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Microeconomics

Tolga Koker

Introduction to the principles of microeconomics, supply and demand, consumer theory, and competitive markets. Applications to contemporary policy issues such as rent control, minimum wage, antitrust policy, pollution, and income inequality. For college students and beyond. May not be taken after ECON 108 or 110. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A (CRN 30157) and Session B (CRN 30158).

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Psychology

Yarrow Dunham

A survey of major psychological approaches to the biological, cognitive, social, and emotional bases of behavior. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Milton

John Rogers

A study of Milton's major poetry, with attention to his relation to the cultural, social, and political struggles of the Puritan Revolution. Students will watch or listen to pre-recorded lectures, and will meet online for biweekly seminar discussions. Satisfies pre-1875 requirement. 1 credit. Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

Moralities of Everyday Life

Paul Bloom

The modern science of moral thought and moral action explored through disciplines such as cognitive science, social and developmental psychology, neuroscience, behavioral economics, and analytic philosophy. Empathy and compassion in babies and young children; emotional reactions to family, friends, and strangers; the origins of prejudice and bigotry; sexuality, disgust, and purity; punishment, revenge, and forgiveness; the relationship between morality and religion. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A  (PSYC S152E, 30181 / PHIL S152E, 30183 / CGSC S152E, 30182) and Session B (PSYC S152E, 30184 / PHIL S152E, 30186 / CGSC S152E, 30185). Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

Movie Physics

Frank Robinson

A critical evaluation of Hollywood action movies, using the laws of physics and Fermi-type estimation techniques to distinguish between fictional and real movie physics. 1 credit. 

2019 Syllabus

Reading and Writing the Modern Essay

Jessie Hill

Close study of selected works of nonfiction prepares students to become critical readers and to apply professional strategies to their own writing. Readings from such authors as Joan Didion, Malcolm Gladwell, Maxine Hong Kingston, N. Scott Monaday, George Orwell, Brent Staples, Jonathan Swift, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Wolfe, and Alice Walker. Written assignments, involving frequent revision, include autobiography, portraiture, nature writing, cultural critique, and formal argument. For college students and beyond. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus 

The Business of Hollywood

Greg Johnson

An examination of the key events and ideas that shape the modern motion picture business from financial, institutional, and historical standpoints. Topics include ways that the business has evolved in response to changes in technology, distribution, and competition; how the business dictates what ends up on screen; and relationships among studios, actors, agents, independent filmmakers, distributors, and the viewing audience. Industry practitioners discuss special topics. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Thinking

Woo-Kyoung Ahn

A survey of psychological studies on thinking and reasoning, with discussion of ways to improve thinking skills. Topics include judgments and decision making, causal learning, logical reasoning, problem solving, creativity, intelligence, moral reasoning, and language and thought. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Brains of Genius: Mozart and Friends

Craig Wright

The changing meaning of the term "genius" from ancient Greece to the present. The nature of genius examined through the lives and working methods of exceptional individuals, including Mozart, da Vinci, Newton, Picasso, and Joyce. Topics such as nature vs. nurture, prodigy, concentration, memory, and exceptional processing skills explored to define and establish markers for genius. Recent developments in neurobiology that may elucidate why some individuals possess extraordinary mental and artistic abilities. 1 credit. Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

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Calculus of Functions of One Variable

Pam Sargent

Limits and their properties. Definitions and some techniques of differentiation and the evaluation of definite integrals, with applications. Use of the software package Mathematica to illustrate concepts. No prior acquaintance with calculus or computing assumed. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Calculus of Functions of One Variable II

Brett Smith

 A continuation of MATH 112. The definite integral, fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, Taylor series, applications. Prerequisite: one term of calculus of functions of one variable (MATH 112 or equivalent). 1 Credit. 

2019 Syllabus

Disinformation and Democracy

Asha Rangappa

This course explores the evolution of information warfare as a national security threat to the United States. Beginning with the KGB’s use of “active measures” during the Cold War, the course looks at how propaganda and disinformation campaigns became central to the Putin regime and how social media has facilitated their expansion and impact. Using Russia’s efforts in the 2016 election as an example, students will examine how the First Amendment places limitations on the U.S.’s ability to counter such operations in the United States and explore how strengthening critical thinking and American social capital might be effective prophylactics against these efforts. For college students and beyond. 1 Credit. 

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Macroeconomics

Marnix Amand

An introduction to basic macroeconomic concepts and theories, such as national income accounting, theories of growth, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, banking, finance, and economic crises, with special emphasis on the recent financial crisis. Prerequisite: ECON 108, 110, 115 or equivalent. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A (CRN 30159) and Session B (CRN 30160).

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Microeconomics

Tolga Koker

Introduction to the principles of microeconomics, supply and demand, consumer theory, and competitive markets. Applications to contemporary policy issues such as rent control, minimum wage, antitrust policy, pollution, and income inequality. For college students and beyond. May not be taken after ECON 108 or 110. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A (CRN 30157) and Session B (CRN 30158).

2019 Syllabus

Introduction to Psychology

Avram Holmes

A survey of major psychological approaches to the biological, cognitive, social, and emotional bases of behavior. 1 Credit. 

2019 Syllabus

Jazz, Race, and Gender in America

Thomas Duffy

A study of the evolution of jazz, from its precursors in the music of Africa through its beginnings in New Orleans to its fusion with rock in the 1970s. Jazz's greatest artists and their styles are presented with selected music of each jazz period and a discussion of the gender, racial and sociological factors surrounding the genre's development. While no extensive music theory background or formal instrumental experience is required, students who can read music will be best prepared to fulfill the listening and form identification assignments. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus

Mental Live of Babies and Animals

Karen Wynn

Interdisciplinary exploration of the cognitive, social, and emotional capacities of creatures lacking language and culture. The extent to which our complex psychology is unique to mature humans; the relative richness of a mental life without language or culture. Some attention to particular human populations such as children with autism and adults with language disorders. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

Moralities of Everyday Life

Paul Bloom

The modern science of moral thought and moral action explored through disciplines such as cognitive science, social and developmental psychology, neuroscience, behavioral economics, and analytic philosophy. Empathy and compassion in babies and young children; emotional reactions to family, friends, and strangers; the origins of prejudice and bigotry; sexuality, disgust, and purity; punishment, revenge, and forgiveness; the relationship between morality and religion. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Offered in both Session A  (PSYC S152E, 30181 / PHIL S152E, 30183 / CGSC S152E, 30182) and Session B (PSYC S152E, 30184 / PHIL S152E, 30186 / CGSC S152E, 30185). Audit option.

2019 Syllabus

Reading the Constitution

Akhil Amar

Intensive introduction to the written Constitution, revolving tightly around two books authored by the instructor--America's Constitution: A Biography (2005) and America's Unwritten Constitution: The Precedents and Principles We Live By (2012). Provides detailed knowledge of America's written Constitution and considers various techniques of constitutional interpretation. For college students and beyond. 1 credit. Audit option.

The Criminal Mind

Arielle Baskin-Sommers

Covers the range of theoretical and empirical material that relates to the understanding of the criminal mind. Four main topics will be covered: personality and psychopathological factors associated with criminal behavior; theoretical and psychobiological explanations of crime; the interaction between biology and environment; the impact of psychobiological models for policy and intervention. 1 credit.

2019 Syllabus