Welcome to the Yale Writers' Conference

If you’re committed to your writing, welcome to the Yale Writers’ Conference.

In Session I, we offer small, intensive workshops, master classes, and craft talks with internationally known authors.  Each of our participants meets individually with workshop faculty. And because we write to be read, we bring panels of agents, literary journals, independent presses, and major publishers to campus for panel discussions and pitch sessions.

Session I and Session II are entirely different.  Session II workshops focus on specific fields, like poetry or playwriting, or distinct genres, such as historical fiction or memoir.  In Session II the workshops meet every day, rather than every other.  There are no visiting faculty or master classes in Session II.  In other words Session II is intended to focus on issues particular to discrete genres. However like in Session I, the workshops are kept small and you meet individually with your workshop leader.

Our writers have the option to live in a Yale College dorm and all participants have full access to the University’s facilities, including dining halls, library, gym, and museums.

 Applications will open on January 17, 2017

  Summer 2017 dates:

  • Session I: June 3- 13, 2017
  • Session II: June 15-18, 2017

Application deadline is May 1, 2017

 

 

Contact: ywc@yale.edu

 

 

 

THE PROGRAM

The Yale Writers’ Conference is proud to engage the services of talented and seasoned instructors with strong records of publication and teaching. Drawing on their unique experience, instructors will provide a variety of their own materials and exercises designed to illuminate and improve all aspects of the craft of writing. Sessions do not rely on a set curriculum, but will instead draw on the expertise of their instructors to provide all participants with a unique and tailored experience.

In Session I, writers will develop their talents while exploring broad issues of craft in ten days of workshops, individual conferences and readings. Visiting faculty will lead master classes limited to no more than thirty writers and deliver craft talks to the Conference as a whole.

And because we write to be read, in Session I we will have panels of agents, publishers, and editors to describe the publishing process and the realities of the writer’s life. Our guests have included publications like the Harvard Review and N+1; editors Elizabeth Beier (St. Martin’s), Rebecca Salatan (Riverhead), and George Gibson (Bloomsbury); and agents Lorin Rees, John Talbot, and Erin Harris.

Session II is intended for writers concentrating in a specific genre. Over four days, they will meet in a seminar with eleven colleagues, led by an author established in the field. The seminar will include exercises and readings as well as discussion of student work. After the seminar, faculty will hold one-to-one meetings with participants. 

 

THE SCHEDULE

SESSION I

June 3 - 13

While master classes and panels offer participants a chance to engage and network with invited guests and visiting faculty, the bulk of their time will be spent in personal writing or in the classroom with their instructors and peers. Divided into fiction and non-fiction groups of no more than ten, participants work closely with their instructors in the classroom and individually over ten days.

Over the course of the session, participants look forward to five classroom sessions with their instructor, which include:

  • Intensive group writing workshops, with the chance to showcase their own writing and receive feedback/critique
  • The chance to learn constructive criticism techniques to give productive feedback
  • Instruction on technique, revision, and submission from their instructors, along with other ‘tricks of the trade’

The program also offers participants at least one one-hour, individual session with his or her instructor, the opportunity to hear instructors at book readings and open-mic nights, and the opportunity to read their own work at student open-mic nights.  Participants also have the chance to socialize over meals with faculty and peers in Yale’s prestigious halls.       

Participants of particular promise, and with polished manuscripts, will be invited by their instructors to participate in pitch sessions after the agents and literary journals panels.  

The program’s schedule comprises alternating formats: one day based on the workshop, the next day, the visiting faculty. Registration is the morning of June 4, followed by a keynote address from Dr. Richard Demming. After lunch, writers will attend their first workshops, then a Welcome Dinner reception at The Graduate Club.

The next day will include a morning master class with that day’s visiting faculty. Writers not assigned to that Master Class can meet with faculty in an individual conference or use the time to write. After lunch, the visiting faculty will hold a craft talk that will be open to all participants.

The following day will begin with workshops in the morning. The afternoon may include guest speakers or writer or faculty readings.  Check out is the morning of June 14th. 

For a complete agenda, please see the PDF located at the bottom of this page.

 SESSION II

June 15 - 18

Session two, taking place over four days, shares the same goals of concentration on craft and technical improvement as session one. Here, participants, in groups of no more than twelve, choose to work with experienced instructors in specific genres, ranging from poetry to memoir to romance.

Participants look forward to guest lectures from visiting speakers and four genre-specific classroom sessions with their instructor, which include:

  • Intensive group writing workshops, with the chance to showcase their own writing and receive feedback/critique
  • The chance to learn constructive criticism techniques to give productive feedback
  • Instruction on technique, revision, and submission from their instructors, along with other ‘tricks of the trade’
  • At least one one-hour, individual session with their instructor
  • The chance to socialize over meals with faculty and peers in Yale’s prestigious halls.

Housing check-in and registration are the morning  of Thursday, June 16. That afternoon, writers will attend their first seminar meetings. On Friday, Saturday and Sunday, the seminars will meet in the morning, with individual conferences or guest speakers in the afternoon.  Writer and faculty readings will take place every evening.

2017 information will be updated soon!  Watch our website.

2016 Draft Agenda

2016 Session I Workshops

2016 Session II Workshops

Alumni Testimonials

 

2017 Faculty will be updated soon!

Our faculty are accessible teachers as well as accomplished writers. Along with classroom and conference time, they will be available to writers in the dining hall during meals and around the college throughout the day.

 

2016 Visiting Faculty

Visiting faculty join us for an entire day.  In the morning, each will lead a master class limited to thirty writers.  (Please note that this means you can attend only one master class.)  After lunch with us in the dining hall, they will deliver a craft talk followed by a question and answer session to the program as a whole. Our Master Class Instructors for 2016 will include:

 

  Amy Bloom is the author of three novels, two of them New York Times bestsellers. She has also written three collections of short stories, a children’s book and a collection of essay. She has been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her stories have appeared in Best American Short Stories, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and numerous anthologies here and abroad. She has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, among many other publications, and has won a National Magazine Award for Fiction. Her best-selling novel, Away, was an epic story about a Russian immigrant. Her most recent and best-selling novel, Lucky Us, (Random House) came out in 2014. She lives in Connecticut and taught at Yale University for the last decade. She is now Wesleyan University’s Distinguished University Writer in Residence.

 

  Michael Cunningham is the author of the novels A Home at the End of the WorldFlesh and BloodThe Hours (winner of the Pen/Faulkner Award & Pulitzer Prize), The Snow QueenSpecimen Days, and By Nightfall, as well as the non-fiction book, Land's End: A Walk in Provincetown. His new book, A Wild Swan and Other Tales (illustrated by Yuko Shimizu) was published in November 2015. He lives in New York and teaches at Yale University.
  Lev Grossman is the author of five novels, including the New York Times bestselling Magicians trilogy. The third book in the trilogy, The Magician's Land, went to #1 on the New York Times bestseller list and was a Notable Book of the Year. An hour-long TV drama based on the series will begin airing on Syfy in early 2016.  Grossman has also been Time magazine's book critic and lead technology writer for over a decade, and has written essays and criticism for the New York Times, Salon, Slate, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, the Village Voice and the Believer, among others. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and three children.
  Claudia Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry including Citizen: An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely; two plays including Provenance of Beauty: A South Bronx Travelogue; and is the editor of several anthologies including The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind. She also co-produces a video series, “The Situation,” alongside John Lucas, and is the founder of the Open Letter Project: Race and the Creative Imagination. Among her numerous awards and honors, Rankine is the recipient of the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation and the National Endowment of the Arts.
  Edmund White has written some twenty books. He is perhaps best known for his biography of French writer Jean Genet, for which he won the National Book Critics Circle Award. He is also the author of a trilogy of autobiographical novels ─ A Boy’s Own Story, The Beautiful Room is Empty, and The Farewell Symphony. He has written a novel about love in the AIDS era called The Married Man, a Brief Life of Marcel Proust, a book about unconventional Paris called The Flaneur, and a biography of Arthur Rimbaud. His works of fiction include Chaos and Hotel de Dream. His most recent book is Inside A Pearl: My Life in Paris; in April 2016 his new novel, Our Young Man, will be published. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, he teaches writing at Princeton and lives in New York City. He’s currently working on a non-fiction book, That Unpunished Vice: Reading.

2016 Resident Faculty

Resident faculty lead the individual workshops.   Many will live in the Residential College with the writers, and all will share breakfast, lunch and some dinners in the dining hall.  For a description of their workshops, please click the link to the PDF on the Program page. Our Workshop Instructors for 2016 will include:

Fiction

  Kirsten Bakis's novel Lives of the Monster Dogs was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, won a Bram Stoker Award, was shortlisted for Britain's prestigious Baily's Prize, has a band named after it, and may soon become a terrifying film. She is the recipient of a Whiting Award, a Michener/Copernicus Society of America grant, and a Teaching/Writing Fellowship from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She's currently at work on various literary projects, has been a member of the resident faculty at the Yale Summer Conference since it began, and is an editor at the literary journal Origins.
  Je Banach has written for The Paris Review, Granta, Esquire, Guernica, Bookforum, PEN, and other venues. In 2014 she was featured in Op-TalkThe New York Times’ curated collection of notable commentary. A previous winner of the Connecticut Artist Fellowship for Fiction and the New Boston Fund Fellowship in Fiction, she was also awarded a residency at Hunt Hill Farm, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, and held informal residencies at Dorset Colony and The Norman Mailer Writers Colony. Banach was a long-time contributor to Harold Bloom’s literary series with Infobase Publishing. She is the author of guides to works by Haruki Murakami, Richard Flanagan, Salman Rushdie, Maya Angelou, Ian McEwan, E.L. Doctorow, and David Mitchell, among others. Banach is a returning member of the YWC faculty; in previous years she taught seminars on literary discourse and led a live q&a session with The New Yorker's fiction editor Deborah Treisman.
  Sybil Baker is the author of The Life Plan, Talismans, and Into This World, which received an Eric Hoffer Award Honorable Mention and was a finalist for Foreword’s Best Book of the Year Award.  Her work has appeared in Guernica, Glimmer Train, The Critical Flame, The Collagist, The Nervous Breakdown, and The Craft: Essays on Writing from the Yale Writers’ Conference Faculty.  She is a UC Foundation Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, was on faculty at City University of Hong Kong’s low residency MFA program, and frequently teaches at the Yale Writer’s Conference.  A MakeWork Artist Grant recipient, she is Fiction Editor at Drunken Boat. In 2015, she was Visiting Professor at Middle East Technical University in North Cyprus. Her essay collection on exiles, expatriates, race, and refugees and a novel titled While You Were Gone are forthcoming from C&R Press.
  Marc Fitten is an editor and author.  He has published opinion pieces in The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His debut novel, Valeria’s Last Stand, was published in ten countries, was an Amazon Best of the Month for May 2009, and held a spot on Der Spiegel’s bestseller’s list for seven weeks. His second novel, Elsa’s Kitchen, was published in World English by Bloomsbury and German by DTV. He lives in Atlanta.
  Trey Ellis is a novelist, screenwriter, playwright, essayist, and an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of the Arts at Columbia University. He is the author of the novels, Platitudes, Home Repairs, and the American Book Award-winning, Right Here, Right Now, as well as the memoir Bedtime Stories: Adventures in the Land of Single-Fatherhood. His work for the screen includes the Peabody-winning and Emmy- nominated Tuskegee Airmen, and Good Fences, which was shortlisted for the PEN Award for Best Teleplay. His essays have appeared in the New York Times, Playboy, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, GQ, and Vanity Fair, and he has contributed audio commentary to NPR’s All Things Considered. His plays Fly and Satchel Paige and the Kansas City Swing continue to be performed around the country, including at Washington, D.C.’s historic Ford’s Theatre. He is currently writing a feature film for HBO on Amos 'n' Andy.
  Molly Gaudry is the author of We Take Me Apart, which was shortlisted for the 2011 PEN/Joyce Osterweil and named 2nd finalist for the Asian American Literary Award for Poetry. We Take Me Apart has been taught at Brown, Wesleyan, Queens College, CUNY, and other creative writing programs in the US. In 2015, Ampersand Books will release Desire: A Haunting, the long-awaited sequel to We Take Me Apart. A hybrid- and multi-genre writer, Molly is also the author of a flash fiction collection, "Lost July," published in the 3-author volume Frequencies (with Bob Hicok and Phillip B. Williams), and her chapbook "Wild Thing" includes poems and essays about recovery after brain injury. She is the creative director at The Lit Pub, and the recipient of a Vice Presidential fellowship at the University of Utah, where she is a PhD candidate in creative writing. She holds an MFA in poetry from George Mason University, an MA in fiction and BA in English Literature from the University of Cincinnati, and a vocational technical degree in creative writing from the School for Creative and Performing Arts, the nation's only K-12 school of the arts.
   Porochista Khakpour is the author of the forthcoming memoir SICK (HarperPerennial, 2017), and the novels THE LAST ILLUSION (Bloomsbury, 2014)—a 2014 "Best Book of the Year" according to NPR, Kirkus, Buzzfeed, Popmatters, Electric Literature, and more— and SONS AND OTHER FLAMMABLE OBJECTS (Grove, 2007)—the 2007 California Book Award winner in “First Fiction,” one of the Chicago Tribune’s “Fall’s Best,” and a New York Times “Editor’s Choice.” Her writing has appeared in or is forthcoming in Harper’s, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, Al Jazeera America, BookforumSlate, Salon, Spin, The Daily Beast, Elle,and many other publications around the world.  She is currently Editor at Large at The Scofield and Contributing Editor at The Offing, and Writer in Residence at Bard College. Born in Tehran and raised in Los Angeles, she lives in New York City. 
  Terra Elan McVoy is the author of six young adult novels, and one for tween readers forthcoming in April 2015. She has a Master's in Creative Writing from Florida State University, and has professional experience working as manager of a children's bookstore, an editorial assistant at a major publishing house, and as a writing coach and instructor for both young people and adults. She is currently a part-time bookseller at Little Shop of Stories in the Atlanta, GA area, where she lives with her husband. Visit terraelan.com
  Lisa Page is a writer, a teacher, and a literary ambassador.  Her work has appeared in VQR, Playboy, Playbill, Phoebe, The Crisis, Society and Space, Savoy, the Chicago Reader, the Washington Post Book World and other publications.  She directs the creative writing program at the George Washington University.  She is also Vice President of the Board of Directors for the PEN/Faulkner Foundation. She has taught writing workshops in a Maryland correctional facility as well as in universities in Chicago, Washington, DC, Virginia, and New Haven, CT. She has interviewed writers for television, magazines and public forums. She has also coached writers, individually, and edited a literary magazine.  She lives outside Washington, DC.
  Marian Thurm  is the author of six novels and four short story collections, including the most recent, Today Is Not Your Day, a New York Times Editors’ Choice. Her novel The Clairvoyant was a New York Times Notable Book. Her short stories have appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, the Michigan Quarterly, the Southampton Review, and many other magazines, and have been included in The Best American Short Stories, and numerous other anthologies. Her books have been translated into Japanese, Swedish, Dutch, and German. In addition to teaching at the YWC since 2013, she has taught creative writing at Yale and Barnard, and in the MFA programs at Columbia University and Brooklyn College.

Non Fiction

  MG Lord is the author of Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll and Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science, a family memoir of aerospace culture during the Cold War. She is a frequent contributor to the NY Times Book Review; her work has appeared in Discover, the New YorkerLos AngelesTravel + LeisureArtForum, and other publications. She has been awarded artistic residencies at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony, as well as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation science-writing grant. She teaches writing at USC. Her most recent book, The Accidental Feminist: How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice, won the Los Angeles Press Club Award for the best book published on an entertainment subject in 2012. In 2013, she was a judge for the National Book Award in Nonfiction. 

  Mishka Shubaly was awarded the Dean’s Fellowship for Fiction by Columbia University. After receiving his expensive MFA, he promptly quit writing to play music in dive bars around the country. He lived out of a Toyota minivan for a year, touring nonstop. He has shared the stage with everyone from The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Metric, and The Decemberists to Richard Price to Doug Stanhope. Mishka is an acclaimed singer-songwriter and the author of six bestselling Kindle Singles for Amazon. His work has been praised for its grit, humor, fearlessness and heart. His latest album, “Coward’s Path” was released in 2015 by Invisible Hands Music. His full-length memoir, “I Swear I’ll Make It Up To You” will be published in 2016 by PublicAffairs.
  Sergio Troncoso is author of From This Wicked Patch of Dust, which Kirkus Reviews named as one of the Best Books of 2012 in a starred review. The novel won the Southwest Book Award. Troncoso also wrote Crossing Borders: Personal Essays, winner of the Bronze Award for Essays from ForeWord Reviews. The Portland Book Review called the collection “Heart-wrenching.” He is also the author of The Nature of Truth, hailed by The Chicago Tribune as “impressively lucid.” Publishers Weekly said of Troncoso’s first book, The Last Tortilla and Other Stories, “These stories are richly satisfying.” Troncoso was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters, and in 2014 he was co-chair of the Literature panel for the New York State Council on the Arts. Steve Inskeep from NPR’s Morning Edition recently interviewed Troncoso for a series on the United States-Mexico border, and the El Paso City Council voted unanimously to rename the Ysleta public library branch in honor of Troncoso. Troncoso also served as a judge for the 2016 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction.

Novel Generator

  Jotham Burrello is an arts entrepreneur—writer, publisher, teacher, editor, video and radio producer. In 2010 he founded Elephant Rock Books, an award-winning press of fiction and nonfiction. He’s currently an assistant professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. He’s the author of the Writers’ e-Handbook, a guide to starting a writing career, and curates the Roar Reading Series. He edited The Craft, Essays on Writing from the Yale Writers’ Conference Faculty. With Janet Burroway, he co-wrote and produced the instructional DVD, So, Is It Done? Navigating the Revision Process, and Submit! The Unofficial Guide to Submitting Short Prose. His writing has appeared in literary journals and the Christian Science Monitor. He is the former editor of Sport Literate, a journal of creative nonfiction. Burrello lives (and drives a tractor) on Muddy Feet Flower Farm in northeast Connecticut.

2017 Faculty will be updated soon!

 

Our faculty are accessible teachers as well as accomplished writers. Along with classroom and conference time, they will be available to writers in the dining hall during meals and around the college throughout the day.

 Biography

   MG Lord is the author of Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Doll and Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science, a family memoir of aerospace culture during the Cold War. She is a frequent contributor to the NY Times Book Review; her work has appeared in Discover, the New YorkerLos AngelesTravel + LeisureArtForum, and other publications. She has been awarded artistic residencies at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony, as well as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation science-writing grant. She teaches writing at USC. Her most recent book, The Accidental Feminist: How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice, won the Los Angeles Press Club Award for the best book published on an entertainment subject in 2012. In 2013, she was a judge for the National Book Award in Nonfiction. 

Children and Young Adult

  Sarah Darer Littman is the critically acclaimed author of BacklashWant to Go Private?; Life, AfterPurge; and Confessions of a Closet Catholic, winner of the Sydney Taylor Book Award. Her upcoming 2016 novels include Charmed I’m Sure, a humorous MG from S & S Aladdin, and In Case You Missed It, from Scholastic Press. When she’s not writing novels, Sarah is an award-winning columnist for CT News Junkie.com. This keeps her life balanced with a fascinating mix of fan mail and hate mail. She teaches creative writing as an adjunct professor in the MFA program at Western Connecticut State University, and with Writopia Lab. Sarah lives in Connecticut. Visit her online at sarahdarerlittman.com or @sarahdarerlitt

Cross Genre 

  Kirsten Bakis's novel Lives of the Monster Dogs was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, won a Bram Stoker Award, was shortlisted for Britain's prestigious Baily's Prize, has a band named after it, and may soon become a terrifying film. She is the recipient of a Whiting Award, a Michener/Copernicus Society of America grant, and a Teaching/Writing Fellowship from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She's currently at work on various literary projects, has been a member of the resident faculty at the Yale Summer Conference since it began, and is an editor at the literary journal Origins.

The Story of a Place

  Marc Fitten is an editor and author.  He has published opinion pieces in The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His debut novel, Valeria’s Last Stand, was published in ten countries, was an Amazon Best of the Month for May 2009, and held a spot on Der Spiegel’s bestseller’s list for seven weeks. His second novel, Elsa’s Kitchen, was published in World English by Bloomsbury and German by DTV. He lives in Atlanta.

Historical Fiction  

  Louis Bayard’s critically acclaimed novels include Mr. Timothy, The Pale Blue Eye, The Black Tower, The School of Night and the recently released Roosevelt’s Beast (Henry Holt).  A New York Times Notable author, he has been nominated for both the Edgar and Dagger awards and, in the words of the Washington Post, has ascended to “the upper reaches of the historical thriller league.”  He is also a nationally recognized essayist and critic whose articles have appeared in the Times, the Post, the Los Angeles TimesSalonand Bookforum.

Life Stories  

  Lisa Page is a writer, a teacher, and a literary ambassador.  Her work has appeared in VQR, Playboy, Playbill, Phoebe, The Crisis, Society and Space, Savoy, the Chicago Reader, the Washington Post Book World and other publications.  She directs the creative writing program at the George Washington University.  She is also Vice President of the Board of Directors for the PEN/Faulkner Foundation. She has taught writing workshops in a Maryland correctional facility as well as in universities in Chicago, Washington, DC, Virginia, and New Haven, CT. She has interviewed writers for television, magazines and public forums. She has also coached writers, individually, and edited a literary magazine.  She lives outside Washington, DC.

Literary Writing at the Intersection of the Arts, Medicine and Science   

  Erika Goldman is publisher and editorial director of Bellevue Literary Press (BLP), a nonprofit mission-driven publisher that has been publishing literary fiction and nonfiction at the intersection of the arts and the sciences since 2007. BLP’s books have received major literary prizes: The Sojourn by Andrew Krivak was a 2011 National Book Award finalist and 2012 winner of the first annual Chautauqua Prize and Dayton Literary Peace Prize, The Jump Artist by Austin Ratner won the 2011 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, and the New York Times best seller Tinkers, by Paul Harding, received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize.

Lyric Essay

  Molly Gaudry is the author of We Take Me Apart, which was shortlisted for the 2011 PEN/Joyce Osterweil and named 2nd finalist for the Asian American Literary Award for Poetry. We Take Me Apart has been taught at Brown, Wesleyan, Queens College, CUNY, and other creative writing programs in the US. In 2015, Ampersand Books will release Desire: A Haunting, the long-awaited sequel to We Take Me Apart. A hybrid- and multi-genre writer, Molly is also the author of a flash fiction collection, "Lost July," published in the 3-author volume Frequencies (with Bob Hicok and Phillip B. Williams), and her chapbook "Wild Thing" includes poems and essays about recovery after brain injury. She is the creative director at The Lit Pub, and the recipient of a Vice Presidential fellowship at the University of Utah, where she is a PhD candidate in creative writing. She holds an MFA in poetry from George Mason University, an MA in fiction and BA in English Literature from the University of Cincinnati, and a vocational technical degree in creative writing from the School for Creative and Performing Arts, the nation's only K-12 school of the arts.

Memoir  

  Jonathan Levi is the author of the 1992 novel A Guide for the Perplexed and the upcoming Septimania (April 2016, The Overlook Press), as well as many plays and opera libretti that have been performed in Italy, the Netherlands, Georgia, the U.K. and the United States. As a founding editor of Granta magazine, Levi edited memoirs of many authors including Graham Greene, James Fenton and John Updike. He has also written political and cultural journalism for The New York TimesThe NationConde Nast Traveler, and many other publications, and served as fiction reviewer for the Los Angeles Times Book Review from 1997-2002. As a theatrical producer and founding director of the SummerScape Festival at Bard College, Levi worked with Elvis Costello, Carly Simon and many extraordinary European artists. He currently lives in Rome and is artistic advisor to the Zaubersee Festival in Lucerne, Switzerland, and co-director of the Gabriel García Márquez Fellowship in Cultural Journalism in Cartagena, Colombia.

Mini-Memoir in the Digital Era

  Mishka Shubaly was awarded the Dean’s Fellowship for Fiction by Columbia University. After receiving his expensive MFA, he promptly quit writing to play music in dive bars around the country. He lived out of a Toyota minivan for a year, touring nonstop. He has shared the stage with everyone from The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Metric, and The Decemberists to Richard Price to Doug Stanhope.  Mishka is an acclaimed singer-songwriter and the author of six bestselling Kindle Singles for Amazon. His work has been praised for its grit, humor, fearlessness and heart. His Kindle Single “The Long Run” has sold nearly 90,000 copies and has been translated into Spanish, German, Polish and Japanese. His latest album, “Coward’s Path” was released in 2015 by Invisible Hands Music. His full-length memoir, “I Swear I’ll Make It Up To You” will be published in hardcover in 2016 by PublicAffairs (Perseus Book Group).

Mystery and Crime Fiction

  Lori Rader-Day’s debut mystery, The Black Hour, won the Anthony Award for Best First Novel and was a finalist for the Mary Higgins Clark Award, as well as Barry and Macavity awards. Her second book, Little Pretty Things, was released in 2015. Lori’s short fiction has appeared in Ellery Queen Mystery MagazineTime Out ChicagoGood HousekeepingMadison Review, and others. She is a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, and International Thriller Writers. Originally from Indiana, she now lives with her husband and dog in Chicago, where she teaches mystery writing at StoryStudio Chicago. Lori earned an MFA in creative writing from Roosevelt University. Visit her at LoriRaderDay.com or on Twitter at @LoriRaderDay

Playwriting 

  Lary Bloom is a playwright, author, editor and writing coach, and cofounder of Writing at the Mark Twain House and Praiano Writers (an Amalfi Coast retreat). His plays include: Wild Black YonderWorth AvenueThings Are a Lot More Like They Are Now Than They Were Two Years Ago, and the musical A Woman of a Certain Age (lyricist). Nonfiction books: Sol LeWitt: A Life of Ideas (upcoming), The Writer Within, Letters from Nuremberg (with Christopher J. Dodd), The Test of Our Times (with Tom Ridge), The Ignorant Maestro (with Itay Talgam), Lary Bloom’s Connecticut Notebook. A novel, The Tales of Feldman, is in the works, as well as a play, 90 Minutes With No Intermission. He taught at Trinity College, Wesleyan University and in Fairfield University’s MFA program, and as editor nurtured early work of such notables as Dave Barry, Carl Hiaasen, Wally Lamb, Edna Buchanan and Madeleine Blais.

 Poetry

  David Gorin's poetry and criticism have appeared in A Public Space, The Believer, Boston Review, Best New Poets 2011, The Claudius App, Jacket, and elsewhere. He is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony residency, a 2005-2006 Dorot Fellowship, and a Teaching and Writing Fellowship from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, from which he holds an MFA in poetry. At present, he is a PhD student in English at Yale University, and curates the WAVEMACHINE reading series in New Haven, Connecticut. He is at work on a poetry manuscript and a dissertation entitled Lyric Poetry After Lyric Poetry, on American poetry after 1980, and writes a monthly column on poetry for the Boston Review online.
  Stephanie Hart holds a BA in English from Barnard College and an MFA in Poetry from the Writing Division of the School of the Arts at Columbia University. She has studied with poets Allen Ginsberg, Derek Walcott and Daniel Halpern, among others. She has many years of teaching experience, including nearly 20 years at Yale’s English Language Institute. Currently, she is Professor of English at Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport, CT where she has served as the Chairperson of the Humanities Department and teaches composition, literature and creative writing.

 Revision and Submission

  Jotham Burrello is an arts entrepreneur—writer, publisher, teacher, editor, video and radio producer. In 2010 he founded Elephant Rock Books, an award-winning press of fiction and nonfiction. He’s currently an assistant professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. He’s the author of the Writers’ e-Handbook, a guide to starting a writing career, and curates the Roar Reading Series. He edited The Craft, Essays on Writing from the Yale Writers’ Conference Faculty. With Janet Burroway, he co-wrote and produced the instructional DVD, So, Is It Done? Navigating the Revision Process, and Submit! The Unofficial Guide to Submitting Short Prose. His writing has appeared in literary journals and the Christian Science Monitor. He is the former editor of Sport Literate, a journal of creative nonfiction. Burrello lives (and drives a tractor) on Muddy Feet Flower Farm in northeast Connecticut.

 

Romance

  Julia Quinn is the #1 New York Times bestelling author of over two dozen historical romance novels. She recently penned the afterword for the Signet Classics edition of Mansfield Park, exploring what it means to be "Jane Austen's least popular novel." She was also a contributor to Hotel Angeline: A Novel in 36 Voices, which placed authors on stage and effectively turned writing into a spectator sport. She is one of only sixteen members of Romance Writers of America's Hall of Fame, her books have been translated into 29 languages, and The Washington Post recently said of her work: "If you've never read romance novels, start here."


Science Fiction

  Elizabeth Hand is the bestselling author of fourteen genre-spanning novels and four collections of short fiction.  Her work has received numerous awards, and several of her books have been New York Times and Washington Post Notable Books.  Her recent, critically acclaimed novels featuring Cass Neary, “one of literature’s great noir anti-heroes,” have been compared to those of Patricia Highsmith.   She is a longtime critic and book reviewer whose work appears regularly in the Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, Salon, the Boston Review, among many others, and writes a regular column for the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.  Her novels and short fiction have been translated into numerous languages and have been optioned for film and television.  For over twenty years, Hand has led writing workshops in the US and abroad, and now teaches at the Stonecoast MFA Program in Creative Writing.  She divides her time between the coast of Maine and North London. 

Screenwriting

  Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer at Yale University where he runs and teaches the entire screenwriting curriculum in the Film Studies Program. Marc has taught screenwriting, playwriting and film analysis workshops on both the graduate and undergraduate levels for The Writing Seminars Department at Johns Hopkins University. He has also lectured extensively on film and conducted screenwriting seminars at Columbia Graduate Film School, the University of Pennsylvania (where he originated the Screenwriting Program), as well as the Screenwriting Series at the Smithsonian Institution. He has been a consultant and expert analyst for movie producers and New Line and Paramount film studios. Marc produced the film, Angel Passing, starring Hume Cronyn, which premiered at the 1998 Sundance Film Festival and then went on to win the Grand Jury Award at Worldfest, the Houston International Film Festival among other awards. Marc also co-produced the film MENTOR, starring Rutger Hauer, which was screened at THE TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL in 2006. He is a graduate of The University of Pennsylvania (’83) and The Iowa Writers’ Workshop (’87). He has won several outstanding teaching awards.

Writing the Novel: The First Ten Pages

  Sybil Baker is the author of The Life PlanTalismans, and Into This World, which received an Eric Hoffer Award Honorable Mention and was a finalist for Foreword’s Best Book of the Year Award.  Her work has appeared in Guernica, Glimmer Train, The Critical Flame, The Collagist, The Nervous Breakdown, and The Craft: Essays on Writing from the Yale Writers’ Conference Faculty.  She is a UC Foundation Assistant Professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, was on faculty at City University of Hong Kong’s low residency MFA program, and frequently teaches at the Yale Writer’s Conference.  A MakeWork Artist Grant recipient, she is Fiction Editor at Drunken Boat. In 2015, she was Visiting Professor at Middle East Technical University in North Cyprus. Her essay collection on exiles, expatriates, race, and refugees and a novel titled While You Were Gone are forthcoming from C&R Press.

Writing for Television

  David Atkins is a multi-hyphenate, recently as a writer on "Hot Tub Time Machine" starring John Cusack for MGM. David wrote and directed "Novocaine", starring Steve Martin, Helena Bonham Carter, and Laura Dern, which was chosen for Gala Premiere Events at numerous prestigious festivals including the Toronto International, BFI London, Austin, and Boston International Film Festivals, and was featured on NPR's "Fresh Air".  David also directed and wrote “Horrible Terrible Misadventures”, a television pilot which won the USA Network Award at the New York Television Festival, and which starred French Stewart, Janeane Garafalo, and Thomas Lennon. Four of his screenplays have been produced. These include "Arizona Dream", starring Johnny Depp and Faye Dunaway, which won the Silver Bear Prize at the Berlin Film Festival. Additionally, David has written original screenplays or pilots for Paramount, Warner Brothers, Sony Pictures, DreamWorks, MTV Films, MGM, NBC, and UGC, as well as scripts for directors Oliver Stone, Luc Besson, and Steve Pink.

 

 

 

2017 Information will be updated soon!

 

2016 Keynote Address



  Richard Deming is a poet and a theorist whose work explores the intersections of poetry, philosophy, and visual culture. His first collection of poems, Let’s Not Call It Consequence (Shearsman, 2008), received the 2009 Norma Farber Award from the Poetry Society of America. He recently published his second book of poems, Day for Night.  

Deming is also the author of Listening on All Sides: Toward an Emersonian Ethics of Reading (Stanford UP, 2008), and he contributes to such magazines as Artforum, Sight & Sound, and The Boston Review. His poems have appeared in such places as Iowa ReviewField, American Letters & CommentaryThe Nation as well as the anthologies Great American Prose Poems: from Poe to the Present, Visiting Wallace: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Wallace Stevens, and Garnet Poems: An Anthology of Connecticut Poetry Since 1776

Winner of the Berlin Prize, he was the Spring 2012 John P. Birkelund Fellow of the American Academy in Berlin. He is the Director of Creative Writing at Yale University.

Guest Speakers

  

John Crowley is a three-time winner of the World Fantasy Award, recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, author of the Aegypt Cycle, Lord Byron's Novel, and Little, Big. Ursula LeGuin described Little, Big as "a splendid madness, or a delightful sanity, or both." The Washington Post Book World dubbed it "the best fantasy yet written by an American."    His most recent novel is Four Freedoms, the story of a young disabled man among many women in a WWII bomber plant.  Crowley has taught creative writing at Yale for eighteen years.  In 2014-2016 he ws a Contributing Editor for Harper's Magazine.

  David Ebershoff’s debut novel, The Danish Girl, won the Lambda Literary Award and was adapted into a feature film starring Academy Award-winner Eddie Redmayne. His most recent novel is the # 1 bestseller The 19th Wife, which was made into a television movie that has aired around the globe. His books have been translated into twenty-five languages to critical acclaim. Ebershoff has appeared twice on Out Magazine's annual Out 100 list of influential LGBT people. He teaches in the graduate writing program at Columbia University and for many years was an editor at Random House. Originally from California, he lives in New York City.  
  Louise Gluck is the author of twelve books of poems and a collection of essays. A second book of essays will be published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2017. Her awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Bollingen Prize for Poetry and the Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets. In 2015 she was awarded the gold medal in poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She teaches at Yale University.

   Aaron Tracy has written on several TV series, including Law & Order: SVU and Fairly Legal.  He’s the Creator and Executive Producer of Sequestered, a serialized thriller about a jury for Sony’s Crackle network, which ran for two seasons.  Aaron has also sold several original TV pilots, including legal dramas to CBS, CBS TV Studios, and 20th Century Fox, political dramas to ABC Family and MGM, and, recently, a basketball drama to MGM.  Aaron is currently at work on a thriller TV pilot for Alcon Entertainment about the nexus of Hollywood and the CIA.  And he’s writing a period drama for USA, The Tap, with Rob Reiner executive producing.  Aaron has also written for film, video games, and is a voting member of the National Board of Review.  Aaron lives and bikes in New York, and teaches about the one-hour drama at Yale University and NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. 
  Carl Zimmer is a New York Times columnist and the author of a dozen books about science. After graduating from Yale with a B.A. in English, he worked at Discover, where he served for four years as a senior editor. He went on to write hundreds of articles for publications including National Geographic, Wired, and The Atlantic. Zimmer is a frequent guest on Radiolab and teaches science writing at Yale.

 

 Closing Remarks

  Colum McCann is the internationally bestselling author of the 2009 National Book Award-winning novel Let the Great World Spin. In his most recent collection of short fiction, Thirteen Ways of Looking, McCann charts the territory of chance, and the profound and intimate consequences of even our smallest moments. A true literary scholar and international artist, Colum McCann speaks with great passion about the writer’s craft and journey. Born in Ireland, he has traveled extensively around the world. He is a member of the Irish Academy, Aosdana, and was awarded a Chevalier des arts et Lettres by the French government in fall 2009. The exclusive American Academy honored him with a literary award in May 2011. McCann’s fiction has been published in 30 languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, Paris Review, Granta, The Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Bomb and other places. He has written for numerous publications including The New York Times, the Irish Times, Die Zeit, La Repubblica, Paris Match, the Guardian, the Times, and the Independent. Previous works include the novels Zoli, Dancer, This Side of Brightness, Songdogs, and TransAtlantic. He currently teaches at the MFA program in Hunter College and lives in New York City.

 

                               

Publisher Panel Discussions - Tuesday, June 7th

John Oakes - Or Books http://www.orbooks.com/

Emmalea Russo - Ugly Duckling Press http://www.uglyducklingpresse.org/

Dan Cafaro – Atticus Books http://atticusbooksonline.com/

 
                               

Agent Panel Discussions - Thursday, June 9th
Pitch sessions to follow discussion, arranged by your instructor.

Soumeya Roberts – Writers House http://www.writershouse.com/

Jacqueline Ko – Wylie Agency http://www.wylieagency.com/

Jaida Temperly – New Leaf Literary http://www.newleafliterary.com/

Amy Boggs – Donald Maass Literary Agency http://maassagency.com/

 

                                        

Editor Panel Discussion - Saturday, June 11th

Gini Kopecky Wallace – Greenpoint Press http://www.greenpointpress.org/index.html 

Allison Lorentzen - Viking Penguin http://www.penguin.com/meet/publishers/vikingbooks/

Millicent Bennett, Grand Central Publishing http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/publishers/grand-central-publishing/

Jotham Burrello - http://www.elephantrockbooks.com/about.html

Chris Campanioni - Pank http://pankmagazine.com/

 
                                   

Literary Panel Discussion - Monday, June 13th 
Pitch sessions to follow discussion, arranged by your instructor.

Tim Tomlinson – Ducts Org http://www.ducts.org/content/

Aaron Burch – Hobart: Another Literary Journal http://hobart.nfshost.com/

Ken Robidoux – Connotation Press http://www.connotationpress.com/

Julie Wakeman Linn – Potomac Review Publishing http://blogs.montgomerycollege.edu/potomacreview/

Chris Campanioni – Pank http://pankmagazine.com/

 

   

DINNER WITH FACULTY

To get to know your workshop instructor and peers, we have arranged an optional dinner.   On June 4 for Session I and on June 16 for Session II these dinners will take place at The Graduate Club http://www.graduateclub.com/ at 155 Elm Street.  The cost of the dinner is $40 per person.  This is a great way to get to know your instructor and other workshop members in an informal atmosphere after your first workshop together.

CLOSING RECEPTIONS

The closing reception for Session I will take place on Monday June 13 at the Provost House, 35 Hillhouse Street.  The traditional New Haven Pizza Truck will be on site offering samples.

The closing reception for Session II will take place on Saturday June 18 at the Q Club, 221 Church Street with remarks by Colum McCann followed by cocktails and lite hors d’oeuvre.  Afterwards, you can take advantage of the many and diverse restaurants that New Haven has to offer for dinner.

READINGS

Workshop Faculty will read from their publications at the Yale Bookstore, 77 Broadway on June 7, June 9, and June 11.  This is open to all participants and their work will be available for purchase.

Students will be able to read from their work to their peers on June 6, June 8, June 10 and June 12.  These will be set up with your workshop instructors at various locations.

MOVIE NIGHT

We will have a movie night under the stars in the Calhoun Courtyard on June 6 or June 8 depending on the weather.   Bring your blanket and a snack!   The evening will start with a cartoon once it is dark.  In the event of rain or inclement weather, the activity will be moved inside and we will have ice cream or a game night led by Yale College students.

EARLY ARRIVAL OR LATE DEPARTURE

This year we are offering those living in the dorm, the option of arriving one day early or departing one day after the program is over.  You can select this option on the registration form once you have been accepted to the program.  There is an additional charge of $64 per night.  Meals are not included.

MORY’S

A Yale Tradition since 1849 is spending time at Mory’s.  http://www.morysclub.org/. For those that arrive early or any writer that lives in the area, we will be holding an information get together at Mory’s, 206 York Street from 8 pm – 10 pm on June 3rd and June 15th.

BUTTERY

Another tradition at Yale is the “buttery”.  Each residential college at Yale has a buttery, which is a late-night cafe with cheap food for purchase and fun basement games like foosball, ping-pong, billiards and a TV set. This summer, the Calhoun College buttery THE TROLLEY STOP will be open for snacks on June 7, June 9, and June 17.  The Buttery is cash only for snacks, so make sure to bring your change!  You will have access to the buttery 24/7 to use for some student readings, casual get-togethers, writing, spending time or watching TV.  You will need to use your prox card (given to all participants at registration) to enter this room.

The Trolley Stop at Calhoun College

YWC OFFICE

We will have an office in Calhoun College staffed during normal business hours.  If you have any questions or need help in any way during the conference, please stop in.  A contact phone number will be available after your arrival.

RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS


For those writers staying in the dorm, we will have Yale Students as Residential Counselors.  They are here to help you with any questions you have about dorm life or New Haven.  The names and locations of your counselor will be available after your arrival.  These students will also be giving tours of the dorm on June 4 and June 16 at 9 pm.  Meet outside the Calhoun College dining hall.

2017 Information will be updated soon

 

Yale and New Haven:

Accommodation & Facilities

Writers and faculty alike will live in Calhoun College for Summer 2016. They will share breakfast, lunch and some dinners in the Trumbull College dining hall. The food features organic and locally sourced selections and a wide variety of choices at each meal. Bedrooms are single occupancy but share a common living space and bathroom with writers of the same gender. Please bear in mind that even though it is a striking setting, it is a college dorm and not a hotel. Writers who prefer air conditioning and housekeeping services should consider staying in one of the local hotels that have offered our participants a discount.

While breakfast, lunch and some dinners are included in tuition, some dinners will be on your own. We  encourage you to explore downtown New Haven and its dozens of excellent restaurants.

Our writers have access to the entire Yale campus. This includes one of the world’s largest gymnasiums as well as some of the country’s largest libraries. The Yale Art Gallery, including its recently renovated sculpture hall, was renowned architect Louis Khan’s first major commission; his last, the British Art Center, is directly across the street. 

 

Calhoun College Courtyard

 

Trumbull College Dining Hall

Applications will open on January 17, 2017 and close on May 1, 2017 - Details coming soon

In Session I, each workshop will be limited to ten writers. The master class is limited to thirty. Each section in Session II includes no more than twelve writers

Admissions are based solely on the writing sample. The writing sample needs to accompany your application for admission, and may be uploaded electronically. It should be about thirteen hundred words.  Please single space your writing using a 12 pt. font as a Word or PDF document. Each page must include your name.   

Once accepted, an applicant is not considered registered until payment has been received. We accept payment through credit card, check or PayPal.

All writers are assigned to a workshop and in Session I writers are also assigned to a Master class in the order in which they register. While we will make every effort to honor your faculty preference, we cannot guarantee it, because we can’t assign you to a workshop that has been filled. We will, however, announce the closing of a workshop immediately on our website to give you an opportunity to make another selection.

You can apply for either or both Sessions I and II.

Applicants must be 18 years old by the start of the program.

2017 Information Coming Soon

2016 Costs and Dates:  

June 4 - June 14

Session 1 (Living in residential college): $3185

Session 1 (Not living in residential college): $2545
 

June 16 - June 19

Session 2 (Living in residential college): $1387

Session 2 (Not living in residential college): $1195

 

June 4 - June 19

Both Sessions (Living in residential college): $4700

Both Sessions (Not living in residential college): $3740


Only credit cards are accepted for the application fee. Upon acceptance the program fees can be paid via credit card or check. Check should be made payable to Yale University and mailed to Yale University, PO Box 208355, New Haven, CT 06510. If paying by credit card, you will be charged within a few days of registration.  Program fees are due in full within two weeks of acceptance or your space may be forfeited. We will refund 75% for cancellation requests received by April 15, 2016 and 50% for cancellation requests received by May 15, 2016.   We will be unable to honor refund requests after then.

The FAQs are divided into categories below for quick reference.

General Questions:

How does the Yale Writers’ Conference differ from other programs that have been around a lot longer?

I’ve never been to a writing program.  Is yours appropriate for beginners?

I’ve published.  Would your program be a waste of my time?

Will the program help me get published?

Is Session II just a shorter version of Session I?

What is the age of YWC participants?

Can I attend more than one workshop?

Can I attend more than one master class?

Can I apply to both fiction and non-fiction?

May I request to change the workshop(s) in which I am enrolled after admission?

Can writers living outside of the United States apply?

For those participating in both Session I and Session II – Do I need to re-register?

For those participating in both Session I and Session II – can I leave campus on the day in between?

Do you have a Facebook page?

Application Specific Questions:

How do I apply?

What should my submission be like? 

What do you look for in a writing sample?

When will I learn if I have been accepted to the program?

Does my writing sample have to be the same thing I intend to present in the workshop? 

I don’t have any work of the length requested for the writing sample. Can I submit several shorter pieces? 

Can I submit a writing sample outside the genre? For example, even if I am applying for fiction, can I submit an essay or poetry? 

I want to attend both Session I and Session II.  Do I have to apply to each separately?  Do I have to submit two writing samples?

Can I submit letters of recommendation?

What percentages of applicants are accepted? 

What does it mean if I am wait listed?

What is the best way to get rejected?

Payment Questions:

If I am accepted, what do I have to do to hold my place?

Which methods of payment do you accept?

Is it possible to obtain a payment plan?

Do you offer financial assistance?

Campus Living Questions:

The residential college is the backbone of undergraduate life at Yale.  Modeled conceptually and architecturally on Oxford and Cambridge, each contains a dining hall, student rooms, lounges, a gym, seminar rooms, a library, performance space, and facilities for hobbies.  We’ll have access to most, but not all, of the common areas; the college gym is usually closed during the summer.  The college is laid out by entryways—stairwells—rather than floors or halls.

May I arrive early or stay later in campus housing than the published program dates?

Can my spouse or partner stay with me in the residential college? 

If I live on campus, will I have a single room?

What are in the rooms?

Will I have a private bathroom?

Do I have to bring my own linens?

Are the rooms air conditioned?

Is there an elevator in the dorm?

How often will my room be cleaned?

What meals are provided in the program fees?

Can I bring a guest to breakfast or lunch? 

Can I bring a guest to events? 

Which Yale facilities are available to YWC participants?

May I bring my own computer?

What if I don’t have a computer to bring, and need access to a Yale computer?

Will there be printing options available on campus?

Can I park at the dorm?

Can I have liquor to my room?

Manuscript Questions:

A manuscript is required by May 15th.    This is the piece that you will be working on while you are at the Yale Writers’ Conference in New Haven.

What should my manuscript be like?

When is my manuscript due?

How do I submit the manuscript?

May I revise my workshop manuscript after it has been submitted?


 

How does the Yale Writers’ Conference differ from other programs that have been around a lot longer?

There are a lot of distinctions.  First, unlike many programs, our admissions are selective.  Our faculty and writers alike have been impressed by the quality of the writing they see in the workshops.  But despite—or maybe because of—competitive admissions, the program’s environment is open and friendly.  We don’t distinguish the published from the unpublished.  Our alumni have formed strong relationships and have gone on to set up their own online workshops so they can continue to work together.  And finally, our writers get a lot of face time with faculty, both resident and visiting. 

I’ve never been to a writing program.  Is yours appropriate for beginners?

Admissions are based exclusively on the strength of the writing sample.  If you’re accepted, the program is right for you.

I’ve published.  Would your program be a waste of my time?

No.  We’ve had quite a few MFA’s and authors of book-length work attend.

Will the program help me get published?

As we always say, we all write to be read.  In Session I, we have panel discussions with literary journals, independent presses, agents, and big-lit editors.  These talks are followed by pitch sessions in which our students present their work.  While we can’t guarantee a result we can guarantee the opportunity.

Is Session II just a shorter version of Session I?

No.  Session I and Session II are entirely different.  Session II workshops focus on specific fields, like poetry or playwriting, or distinct genres, such as historical fiction or memoir.  In Session II the workshops meet every day, rather than every other.  There are no visiting faculty or master classes in Session II.  In other words Session II is intended to focus on issues particular to discrete genres.

What is the age of YWC participants?

Writers are over the age of 18. Unfortunately, we are not able to make an exception for minors but encourage those under the age of 18 to apply in a future year. Writers of all ages attend.  We have had participants from 18 years to 90 years attend.

Can I attend more than one workshop? 

No. You’ll work with the same faculty and colleagues throughout the program.  That’s equally true in both Sessions.

Can I attend more than one master class?

No. Master classes are limited in size.  You may only attend the Master Class to which you have been admitted.  However everyone can attend the Craft Talk in the afternoon offered by the Master Class Instructor.

Can I apply to both fiction and non-fiction?

Yes, you may apply, but you can only attend one.  You will also have to supply two writing samples. Please combine all pages into one document for uploading with your application.

May I request to change the workshop(s) in which I am enrolled after admission?

Upon approval of the Director, and only if there is space available.  

Can writers living outside of the United States apply?

 Yes. They can attend the program on a B-2 visa.

For those participating in both Session I and Session II – Do I need to re-register?

No, you do not need to register twice.

For those participating in both Session I and Session II – can I leave campus on the day in between?

Yes.

Do you have a Facebook page?

Yes, please go to our Facebook page and send us a request to join the page. Membership is limited to admitted YWC writers.

How do I apply?

Please visit our website and click on the application link.

What should my submission be like? 

A writing sample is required to complete your application. The sample should be about 1,300 words and submitted in Word or as a PDF document. Each page should include your name.  Please use font size 12. If your writing sample is more than 1,300 words only the first portion will be reviewed for admission.

 Please be sure that your writing sample is specific to the genre of the workshop to which you are applying.

What do you look for in a writing sample?

A voice and words in the right place.  The former means that we can hear the writer talking; the latter, prose that’s neither over mannered or awkward.  And that doesn’t necessarily mean that we like the piece—just that it’s well written.

When will I learn if I have been accepted to the program?

Applications received by February 28 will have decisions made by March 16.  Applications received by April 30 will have decisions made by May 18.

Does my writing sample have to be the same thing I intend to present in the workshop? 

No. We are just interested in getting a sense of your writing. You are free to submit something else if you are accepted.

I don’t have any work of the length requested for the writing sample. Can I submit several shorter pieces? 

Yes, but remember, whatever you submit has to be appropriate for that workshop. Please combine all pages into one document for uploading with your application.

Can I submit a writing sample outside the genre? For example, even if I am applying for fiction, can I submit an essay or poetry? 

No. Please submit a writing sample appropriate to the genre of your workshop choice.

I want to attend both Session I and Session II.  Do I have to apply to each separately?  Do I have to submit two writing samples?  

No.  Just make sure you’ve indicated on the application that you want to attend both Sessions.  Submit an appropriate sample for Session II. If you’re admitted to Session II, you’ll also be accepted for Session  I.

Can I submit letters of recommendation?

No. Your application is evaluated exclusively on the strength of your writing.

What percentages of applicants are accepted? 

That varies according to session and section. In general, we accept about 50% of our applicant

What does it mean if I am wait listed?

Applications are evaluated in two rounds. If someone is waitlisted in the earlier round, it may mean that we simply want to hold his or her application until we have a better idea of what the second round applicant pool is like. We also need to see how many of those accepted in the first round actually enroll.

What is the best way to get rejected? 

Obviously, this is not a question frequently asked, but it should be.  The answer is sloppiness. The Director will stop reading at the first spelling error, and if you submit an application that doesn’t follow the guidelines, you have raised a red flag.

If I am accepted, what do I have to do to hold my place?

Remit payment by the deadline. Writers are enrolled in order of payment. For that reason, if you delay payment your first choice workshop can fill up, and you’ll get your second choice. The same is true with master classes. We do, however, post workshop and master class closures as they occur.

Which methods of payment do you accept?

We can accept a check or Visa/MasterCard.

Is it possible to obtain a payment plan?

No.

Do you offer financial assistance?

No.

May I arrive early or stay later in campus housing than the published program dates?

Yes, you may arrive one day early or stay one extra night, at an addional cost per night.  Please fill this in on your application or let the YWC office staff know prior to your arrival.

Can my spouse or partner stay with me in the residential college? 

No. If you do want to travel with a companion, we suggest that you stay in a hotel.

If I live on campus, will I have a single room?

Yes but you will share a common space with other writers. 

What are in the rooms?

The rooms at Yale are simply furnished and include an extra-long twin bed and mattress, desk, chair, bureau, recycle bin and waste basket.  Clothes hangers are not provided.  And remember to bring your own toiletries.  The Yale bookstore does sell these items if you wish to purchase them upon your arrival. 

Will I have a private bathroom?

No, the bathrooms, which are located in the hallways/entryways, are shared among those staying on that floor.

 Do I have to bring my own linens?

All campus housing guests will be issued linen packs, which includes a fitted sheet, bed sheet, one pillowcase, and three towels.  

Are the rooms air conditioned?

No, Yale rooms are not centrally air-conditioned and portable air conditioners are not permitted.  You can feel free to bring a fan with you if you feel that you will need one or you can purchase one at the Yale Bookstore.  

Is there an elevator in the dorm?

There is no elevator in the dorm.

How often will my room be cleaned?

No one will be allowed to enter your room without your permission.  This means that your room will not be cleaned during your stay.  Nor will garbage or recycle items be collected from the rooms.  You are responsible for taking your own garbage and recycle items to the main collection bins located in the basement. 

What meals are provided in the program fees?

Breakfast, lunch and some dinners are provided in the college dining hall for all participants including those living on their own.  Each meal comprises several different options, many locally sourced and organic.  Here’s a link to give you an idea.  

 http://www.yaledining.org/menu.cfm?mDH=4.   

Some dinner are on your own but you won’t lack for options.  New Haven has the best and broadest restaurant scene in the state by a wide margin, all within an easy walk of the dorm and classrooms.

Can I bring a guest to meals in the dining hall? 

Yes. Be aware that they will have to pay for the meal at the guest rates.

Can I bring a guest to events? 

You can bring a guest to public events off campus, such as faculty readings. Guests are not allowed to attend events and sessions on campus.

Which Yale facilities are available to YWC participants?

Use of Sterling Memorial Library and Payne Whitney Gymnasium are included in your YWC costs. There are many other university resources available to you as well during your stay, some free and some at a small additional cost (art galleries, museums, musical performances etc.).

May I bring my own computer?

Yes, you may use the Yale guest network for internet access while you are on campus.  You sign on as Yale Guest.

What if I don’t have a computer to bring, and need access to a Yale computer?

You may use one of Yale’s computing clusters but you will need to request a Guest Access ID at least 2 weeks prior to arrival for the program.  There is a slight charge for this service.

Will there be printing options available on campus?

No, however there are two printing companies located close to campus.  Tyco Printing located at 262 Elm Street or Docuprint located at 27 Whitney Avenue.

Can I park at the dorm?

No, there are no parking lots for the dorm.  We do offer a parking option in the Pierson-Sage Garage.  This garage is gated and patrolled.  It is located on the corner of Whitney and Edwards Street at 340 Edwards Street.  This is approximately 1 mile from the dorm and classrooms.  There is a charge for parking.  A free shuttle runs to and from the garage every 20 minutes.  To sign up for parking, you will be sent instructions closer to your arrival date.  You pay for parking separately from the program fees.   Or you can find your own park in a private lot in New Haven at your own expense.

Can I have liquor to my room?

In the summer the residential colleges are dry.  Nothing in the dining hall, nothing in the rooms.  If you’re caught, you’re thrown out.  No exceptions. 

What should my manuscript be like?

You can use the piece you submitted with your application if you wish.  Manuscripts should be between 5000-5500 words in length for Session I and no more than 4000 words in length for Session II.  Please make sure you add your name and title to your piece.  It should be double spaced, and can be in either a Word or PDF format.   You may submit multiple pieces in the same attachment so long as they don't exceed that total.  

When is my manuscript due?

May 15th.

How do I submit the manuscript?

Your workshop instructor will get in touch with you about how they would like you to submit your manuscript.

May I revise my workshop manuscript after it has been submitted?

No, we do not accept revisions.