Yale Writers' Conference - 2014

Summer 2015 course information coming soon!

Welcome to the Yale Writers’ Conference 2014

The Yale Writers’ Conference is an intensive program for the committed writer. Our faculty are nationally known writers who are also inspiring and accessible teachers. Our facilities are the Yale campus.

Each year over a hundred and forty writers from around the world have come to New Haven for each of two sessions. They have gone on to publish their first books or stories, produce plays, and organize a writing workshop for veterans.

Join us this summer!

Yale Writer's Conference Agenda


Anouncements:

THE PROGRAM

In Session I, writers will develop their talents while exploring broad issues of craft in nine days of workshops, individual conferences and readings. Visiting faculty will lead master classes limited to twenty-five writers and deliver craft talks to the Conference as a whole.

And because we write to be read, panels of agents, publishers, and editors will describe the publishing process and the realities of the writer’s life. Our guests have included publications like the Harvard Review and N+1; editors Elizabeth Beier (St. Martin’s), Rebecca Salatan (Riverhead), and George Gibson (Bloomsbury); and agents Lorin Rees, John Talbot, and Erin Harris.

Session II is intended for writers concentrating in a specific genre. Over four days, they will meet in a seminar with eleven colleagues, led by an author established in the field. The seminar will include exercises and readings as well as discussion of student work. After the seminar, faculty will hold one-to-one meetings with participants.  In our final day, faculty, agents, and editors will discuss the business of writing and meet with students.

THE SCHEDULE

SESSION I

June 7 - 17

The program’s schedule comprises alternating formats: one day based on the workshop, the next day, the visiting faculty. Registration is the morning of June 7, followed by a keynote address from Dr. Richard Selzer. After lunch, writers will attend their first workshops, then a dinner reception at Mory’s, a Yale tradition since 1848.

The next day will include a morning master class with that day’s visiting faculty. Writers not in the class can meet with faculty in an individual conference or use the time to write. After lunch, the visiting faculty will hold a craft talk, followed by a panel discussion with members of the publishing world.

The following day will begin with workshops in the morning. The afternoon may include guest speakers or writer or faculty readings.

The program ends June 16th after a final workshop, a panel of editors, and a reception on campus.  Check out is the morning of June 17th.

SESSION II

June 18 - 22

Housing check-in and registration are the afternoon of Wednesday, June 18. On Thursday, writers will attend their first seminar meetings. On Friday, Saturday and Sunday, the seminars will meet in the morning, with individual conferences or panel discussions in the afternoon.  Sunday afternoon will include panel discussions with faculty, agents, and editors on the mechanics and business of publishing.

Student and faculty readings will take place every evening.

  

SESSION I

June 7 - 17

Workshops

The workshop is the heart of the program. It is led by a noted author who is also an experienced and accessible teacher. You and nine colleagues will spend every other morning in a session that may include assigned readings and exercises, but will focus on the discussion of student writing. All writers will submit their work a month before the program begins to permit in depth discussion in the workshop.

 Individual Conferences

Each writer will have an hour-long individual conference with his or her workshop leader. This will include discussion of the workshop submission as well as more general craft and career issues.

 The Master Class

Each visiting faculty will lead a master class limited to twenty-five writers admitted on a first come first served basis. The format will be determined by the faculty. In the afternoon, the visiting faculty will deliver a craft talk and discussion for the entire program. 

The Writing Life

We write in order to be read. Throughout the program we will present discussions with agents, journal and independent press publishers, and editors from major imprints.

 

Session II

June 18 - June 22

Session II is intended for writers who want to work on the questions specific to their chosen genres. Each section will include no more than twelve writers, led by faculty well known in the field. It will meet for two hours a day and may include assigned readings, but will focus on group discussion of participants' work. When not in sessions, faculty will meet with writers for individual conferences. Session II may also feature panel discussions on topics common to multiple fields as well as talks by agents and editors. Sections and their faculty are listed below, along with course descriptions.

Biography: M.G. Lord

 The role of the biographer, Virginia Woolf once wrote, is to "admit contradictory versions of the same face."

 This is also the biographer's greatest challenge--constructing a living (or once-living) person on the page, without reducing him or her to a single dimension.  This class will address the issues and techniques of biography, ranging from research to writing.  We will look at the structures of  successful biographies, including the work of Leon Edel and Robert Caro. And we will discuss ethical and legal concerns, including copyright restrictions on unpublished material and the privacy rights   of nonpublic figures.

Children & Young Adult: Terra Elan McVoy

What is the difference between writing for young people, and writing for adults? Largely, perspective. High concepts, emotional complexities, and intense subject matter don't necessarily have to be off-limits, so long as the narration authentically comes through the eyes of a young person. In this workshop we will focus on the important basics of all fiction writing (character, action, balanced description, etc.), with a special eye on making sure the perspective stays true to the younger mind.

Crime Fiction and Thrillers: Hope Dellon

 "Who cares who killed Roger Ackroyd?" critic Edmund Wilson demanded in a famously provocative essay in 1945. After sampling some acclaimed crime fiction of the day, he continued: "The enthusiastic reader of detective stories will indig­nantly object at this point that I am reading for the wrong things: that I ought not to be expecting good writing, characterization, human interest or even atmos­phere."

 Nonsense. As an editor of crime fiction for several decades, I expect exactly those things, along with a clever and compelling plot. The good news is that the standard I've seen in thousands of crime manuscripts is often remarkably high. The not-so-good news is this general competence sets the bar higher in order for a book to get noticed or, especially, rise to the top of a very competitive field. What makes a thriller competent in the first place, or beyond that, outstanding? How can a writer stay in front of the latest trends? (Short answer: don't bother.) Does crime writing really differ from other fiction writing, and if so, how? Once you have the basics for a good crime novel, what can you do to make it better?

Cross Genre: Kirsten Bakis

In this course we'll talk about how to write fiction that uses elements from one or more genres in the service of your own unique story. We'll explore the idea of genre, and how your work can evolve within and beyond it to become as rich, quirky, multidimensional and alive as it needs to be. This requires striking a balance between structure and freedom, logic and mystery; and it means finding your own voice. Outside readings will supplement our workshop discussions.

Family Stories: Priscilla Gilman

In this mixed genre class, open to both non-fiction and fiction writers, we will explore the complex challenges of writing about families.  What are the ethics, risks, and rewards of writing about our parents, our children, our siblings, our romantic partners, or of telling imaginative family stories?  When does it make sense to fictionalize and when is memoir a more effective approach?  How do we make our personal lives and/or intimate family stories relevant and compelling to larger audiences?  What role can family stories play in commentary on political, social, or cultural events?  What is the relationship between memory and history, facts and truth?   We'll discuss dialogue and description, voice and characterization, point of view, scene building, plot, and structure, and students will learn how to craft personal essays, magazine pieces, newspaper op-eds, short stories, and book-length manuscripts.  Equal attention will be paid to the emotional/psychological and the structural/formal challenges of telling family stories.

Flash Fiction: Molly Gaudry

Flash fiction has all the essential elements of longer fiction: character, setting, plot, and narrative -- but the goal is to distill these down to a single dramatic moment, the story's reason for existing at all. In this course, we'll read and write flash fiction, or stories and prose poems under 1,000 words. We will also learn about several literary journals and book publishers that consistently publish the best flash fiction and prose poems. Please submit up to three flash fictions (no more than 1,000 words each).

Historical Fiction: Louis Bayard

"The historical novel is, for me, condemned.  You may multiply the little facts that can be got from pictures and documents, relics and prints, as much as you like—the real thing is almost impossible to do, and in its essence the whole effect is as nought.”  That’s Henry James’ throwdown.  It’s up to the historical novelist to refute it … but how do we make the dead souls live again?  What responsibilities do we have to fact?  To ancient ways of speaking and doing?   Does research enhance our task or get in the way?  This course will explore both the challenges and promises of the historical-fiction genre as students work toward James’ impossible dream: “the invention, the representation of the old consciousness.”

Humor: Colin McEnroe

“There are several kinds of stories, but only one difficult kind--the humorous.”  So said Mark Twain, and he was not wrong. Humor is indeed very difficult and done well by only a few. Like all other kinds of writing, however, humor has methods that are understandable and wisdom that is transferable. In this seminar, we will look at some instances of people – from James Thurber to Ron Carlson – doing it well and analyze the work of participants. People whose work is not funny will be placed in a large humanoid wicker frame and immolated. That is probably a joke. In this seminar you will learn which things are jokes and which things are not.

Life Stories: Sergio Troncoso 

For fiction and nonfiction writers, this workshop will focus on writing about families, personal dramas, and the struggles of life. How do we decide whether to fictionalize personal stories, or craft narrative nonfiction dramas about our fathers, mothers, siblings, friends, or ourselves? What are the important ethical issues of our choices? These "Life Stories" have often resonated with readers, particularly those focused on the outsiders in our society. We will analyze the craft of storytelling the truth, and what that might mean in both fiction and nonfiction, from the writer's voice to shaping characters. Brutally honest stories and essays stay with readers long after they have been read: how can we craft our literary work to reach these psychological and moral truths? We will discuss your short stories, novel chapters, memoirs, and personal essays, but we will also focus on producing new work for this intensive workshop.

Life Stories: Lisa Page

"The beauty of memory rests in its talent for rendering detail, for paying homage to the senses, its capacity to love the particles of life, the richness and idiosyncrasy of our existence...If we learn not only to tell our stories but to listen to what our stories tell us--to write the first draft and then return for the second draft--we are doing the work of memory." —Patricia Hempl

This mixed genre course will focus on the work of memory with a literary twist.  We will explore the shape of the story, in terms of structure and design.  And we will explore the soul of  the story, in terms of voice and point of view. We will also discuss the heft of the story and why some life stories especially stand out.  What makes these stories feel so compelling?   All life stories are welcome, be they short stories, essays, novel excerpts or prose poetry.  We will discuss these as well as the works of others.  And we will create one new work.

Literary Writing at the Intersection of the Arts, Medicine, and Science: Erika Goldman 

“There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.”—Vladimir Nabokov

 Are truth and fact one and the same? What are the responsibilities of the creative popular writer when treating real-world questions in the sciences or medicine? How can you make technical or complex subjects live on the page without oversimplifying them? In this section, we will explore some of the many ways in which the authorial imagination can fruitfully engage in a dialogue with the medical or “hard” sciences. Through readings of selected excerpted texts, we will examine an array of formal approaches and discuss issues you’ve encountered in your own work. For writers of fiction and narrative nonfiction that explore medical, technological, or scientific themes to get at deeper truths about the human condition. 

Memoir: Robin Hemley

Memoir as a form takes its fair share of abuse, sometimes for good cause and sometimes unfairly.  One problem is that some memoirs and their readers seem concerned only with content and not so concerned with form.  For this reason, publishers and readers fall prey sometimes to fake memoirs, or failed novels that couldn't be sold as fiction.  But a bad novel shouldn’t make a good memoir, and best memoirs are those that are at least as concerned with structure and language as they are with content.  Confession, trauma, and witness are all venerable catalysts for literature, but sometimes what’s not told is more powerful that what’s revealed. 

 In this session, we’ll deal with the role of imagination in memoir, “truth,” confession, structure, experimentation, metaphor, and the value of the prologue.  Everyone will write at least one prologue for their memoir and will try to unearth not only what their memoir is about, but what it’s really about. 

Playwriting: Amy Herzog

Playwriting 101. A crash course in the basic elements of dramatic writing: event, character, conflict, objective, negotiation, subtext. Discussions will be supplemented by reading the work of contemporary playwrights like Pinter and Mamet. New work will be generated during the conference; do not expect to workshop plays that have already been written. This is intended as an introductory course for first-time playwrights or a refresher for those just starting out. In-class and at-home writing exercises will culminate in the creation of ten-minute plays. 

Poetry: David Gorin

This is a class on poetry, and therefore a class about how to play. In it, we’re going to practice ways to lose control so we can find it later when we least expect it, to distract our inhibitions until we’re prancing through the library, where the scholar is hard at work, wearing nothing but guitars. “The shot will only go smoothly” says the master, “when it takes the archer himself by surprise.” When you surprise yourself while writing, you will surely surprise others; and though you can’t will lightning to strike you, you can fly a kite with a key on it—there is no shortage of storms. The key is to turn it over to some hand other than your own. Poetry loves that kind of company. This is why we are here.

 Each class meeting will have two parts: a first part where we’ll talk about ways of making poems, and a second part where we’ll talk collectively about poems you have made. Both parts will be filled with questions. How does a poem know when it should end? How does it produce principles that assist in its own generation? Why do jokes tend to have three terms (“a rabbi, a priest, and Justin Bieber walk into a bar…”) and songs a “bridge” after the second chorus? What makes some rhymes, rhythms, and repetitions delicious, and others dull? How can a poem be a narrative without telling a story, or support all sorts of crazy disconnected things while still cohering? What is irony and how can it be used with feeling? We’ll address these questions in part by looking at poems by others—some dead (Shakespeare, Dickinson), some living (John Ashbery, Anne Carson, Robert Hass, Lyn Hejinian), and some so young they grew up listening to hip-hop (Ben Lerner, Ariana Reines, Chelsea Minnis, Anthony Madrid). We’ll also listen to other kinds of music (from Steve Reich to Justin Timberlake) to see how their patterns can clarify ours. We’ll write poems using constraints based on collaboration, collage, concrete nouns, received forms, and forms we invent ourselves. Most of all, we will create a space where you can think, feel, and speak with others who care about writing, who you will come to know, and hopefully discover in that speaking more than you knew was there.

  Poetry: Stephanie Hart

The goal of this seminar is to develop the poet’s ability to create vibrant imagery, effective line breaks and line integrity as well as make communicative language choices. Focusing on these basic elements will strengthen the work of both new and experienced poets.  In-class exercises will not only generate material to manipulate in service of these goals but also introduce a random element to help access new areas of exploration. Homework assignments will further develop the material begun in class.

Workshops will focus on the resulting poems and, if time permits, students will have the option of workshopping poems they have written before taking this seminar. These workshops will help students to discover pleasure in revision and in abandoning, at times, one’s original conception for a poem. Individual conferences will further these goals and give students the opportunity to talk privately about their work.

Poetry for Prose Writers: Rick Jackson

Ever wonder what they meant when they talk about a story’s or novel’s great style or lyrical and evocative moments?   When they refer to the style of the writer? What they are referring to is the “poetry” in the prose. It is what distinguishes great prose writers like Faulkner, Clarice Lispector or Cormac McCarthy from lesser writers. In fact, many famous writers, too (including Hemingway and Faulkner) began as poets. The great Italian novelist, Cesare Pavese, also began as a poet.

In this generative workshop, we’ll explore the give-and-take that happens between lyric and story line within our prose as a means to create a compelling narrative.  Each session will include a look at a couple of models, a look at our own work, and an in class writing session based on our discussions. Given the short span of our sessions, we’ll begin by comparing some so called “prose poems,” Flash fiction” and “Flash CNF” and work in the last session towards full length prose. Along the way we will ask what all these have in common and how can we use techniques of one to help the other. We’ll use these insights to help break out of your habitual writing style and into something that’s more authentically and uniquely your own voice. This is a workshop that is also suitable for poets, too, especially those who want to make excursions into prose.

Revision and Submission: Jotham Burrello

 This section is designed for writers ready to tinker, tighten and sharpen a short story or essay for submission. Writers put a completed draft through rounds of revision—revising and re-imagining— using a combination of journaling, exercises, read-alouds and a workshop session. Come ready to roll up your shelves as we juggle regimented work and further play, and learn revision strategies to file in your writer’s toolbox. Day three includes an overview on the literary marketplace. Participants  receive the revision DVD, “So, Is It Done?” produced by writer, teacher and publisher Jotham Burrello, the facilitator for this session.

Science Fiction and Fantasy: John Crowley

 3-time World Fantasy Award winner John Crowley teaches an intensive mini-course in Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction. The two genres ought to be opposites -- one is about worlds that can't exist, and the other is about worlds that might -- but we all know they DO go together:  they are both realms of romance.  Students will do in-class exercises in the special language of these genres, study some revealing examples, and workshop one piece of their own. Discussion subjects will include taxonomies of fantasy, SF and science, the universe of romance, reading like a writer rather than a fan, and the fantasy/SF market today.

Science Fiction and Fantasy: Jeff and Ann VanderMeer

Hugo & World Fantasy Award winning editor Ann VanderMeer and World Fantasy Award-winning writer Jeff VanderMeer teach a mini-course on Fantasy & Science Fiction as literature of the imagination, using Jeff’s Hugo Award-finalist Wonderbook, the world’s first fully illustrated creative writing guide. Whether expressed literally or through metaphor, a non-realist worldview permeates aspects of many genres and approaches. In-class exercises will include finding the autobiographical in the fantastical, use of surrealism and constraint to energize even the most traditional approaches, and analysis of successful but atypical scenes as the jumping-off point for discussion of characterization, setting, and the numinous.

Screenwriting: Trey Ellis

 The screenwriting program is intended for storytellers with little or no previous experience writing for the screen who are, however, hungry for an intensive workshop helping launch them toward a completed feature-length screenplay. Classes will focus on the peculiar architecture of writing for the screen and how to mold that form in the service of creating irreplaceable characters, vibrant dialogue and compelling storytelling. Those admitted must own screenwriting software.

Travel and Food Writing: Corby Kummer

Everyone likes travel. Most people like food. How to write about it in a way that's instructive, useful, and not smug? An intensive writing workshop in which students will be guided through drafts of articles to make them progressively more cogent, engaging, marketable, tempting, and with luck funny.

Writing for Television: Stephen Tolkin and Richard Kramer

 Television writing has, with the profusion of cable networks, entered a new golden age. In this class, students will learn how to prepare a pitch, which is what a writer must do to sell her idea to a studio or network. To paraphrase Somerset Maugham, there are three characteristics shared by all good pitches. Nobody knows what they are. But there are elements, learned from years of experience, that we can impart. What “makes” a good idea? How to seek, beneath the surface of that good idea, the larger statement that the show can make? And how to orchestrate the presentation of that idea so it can have the maximum impact on a roomful of people with no attention span? Students will learn what makes a good character, and how to build one from the bottom up. They will also learn how to build an ensemble, as television, because of its intimacy, has always thrived in the characters that viewers take very personally to heart. Students will learn structure, how there are certain firm rules and no rules at all, and how one always has to walk the line between those two states. And they will write the first act, or first twenty pages, of a pilot script.

 This class will not show you how to use a computer program so your script looks “professional”. It will nothelp you get an agent.

 It will show you that the most important element in good television writing is voice – your own unique way of seeing things, and dramatizing them on page and screen. The great series all share that one element. By the end of the class, you will have learned ways to access that voice, put it in a recognizable, hopefully sellable format. And then – you’re on your own.

Independent Press Panel 

We’re happy to announce the following independent presses will be represented for a panel discussion followed by individual pitch sessions. Appearing will be:

  • Akashic
  • Elephant Rock Books
  • C&R Press
  • Rose Metal Books
  • Braddock Avenue Books
  • Sarabande
  • Bellevue Literary Press
  • Brooklyn Arts Press

Literary Journals

The following literary journals will appear for a panel discussion to be followed by individual meetings. Present will be:

  • Post Road
  • Tin House
  • The Masters’ Review
  • Redivider
  • Story
  • Harvard Review
  • New Haven Review
  • Agni

Magazines

In a departure for the typical writers’ conference. we are happy to welcome representatives from major circulation magazines for a panel discussion. They include:

  • GQ
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Rolling Stone
  • Harpers
  • Vanity Fair

Guest Speakers

In addition to panel discussions with literary journals and agents, we will be featuring a number of guest speakers. They will include:

  • Dan Kois , Book reviewer for Slate.com
  • Jonathan Levi, founding editor of GRANTA
  • John Fine of Amazon

 

Our faculty are accessible teachers as well as accomplished writers. Along with classroom and conference time, they will be available to writers in the dining hall during lunch and around the college throughout the day.

Program Director

Terence Hawkins is a graduate of Yale College, where he was Publisher of the Yale Daily News.  His first novel, TheRage of Achilles is a recounting of the Iliad in modern and sometimes brutal prose.   His next, American Neolithic, will appear in May.  His stories, humor, and opinion pieces have appeared online, in print, and on public radio.  He became founding director of the conference in 2011.

FACULTY - SESSION I

Our visiting authors will each spend an entire day with the program. The 2014 visiting faculty will include:

Master Class

Nicholson Baker is the author of ten novels and four works of nonfiction, including The Mezzanine, Vox, Double Fold, Human Smoke, and The Anthologist.  He has received a National Book Critics Circle award, a James Madison Freedom of Information Award, and the Katherine Anne Porter Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.  His work has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, and The New York Review of Books.  A new novel, Traveling Sprinkler, was published in 2013.  He lives with his family in Maine.
Wyndmere, ND, native Chuck Klosterman is the best-selling author of eight books, including the recently released I Wear the Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined). He is currently employed by the New York Times Magazine (where he writes The Ethicist column) and by ESPN. He has also written for SPIN, Esquire, GQ, the Washington Post, the Guardian, and the Believer.
Colum McCann was born in Ireland in 1965. He is the author of six novels and two collections of stories. He has been the recipient of many international honors, including the National Book Award, the International Dublin Impac Prize, a Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government, election to the Irish arts academy, several European awards, the 2010 Best Foreign Novel Award in China, and an Oscar nomination. His work has been published in over 35 languages. He lives in New York with his wife, Allison, and their three children. He teaches at the MFA program in Hunter College.
Rick Moody has received the PEN/Martha Albrand Award, the Addison Metcalf Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Paris Review's Aga Khan Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.
Richard Selzer, formerly a practicing general surgeon, is a critically acclaimed author of essays, a memoir, and short stories whose reflections on medicine have made his work required reading in many medical schools. His collection, The Doctor Stories, was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award; his other work includes Confessions of a Knife; Letters to a Young DoctorDown from Troy and Diary.

Session I - Fiction

Sybil Baker is the author of The Life Plan, Talismans, and Into This World, which received an Eric Hoffer Award Honorable Mention, and was a finalist for Foreword’s Best Book of the Year Award. Recent work has appeared in Guernica, Glimmer Train, The Nervous Breakdown, and The Collagist. She teaches at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and is on faculty of the first international MFA Program at City University of Hong Kong. A MakeWork Artist Grant recipient, she is fiction editor at Drunken Boat
Je Banach was the 2013 recipient of the Connecticut Artist Fellowship for Fiction. She has written for the Paris ReviewEsquire, Granta, Guernica, Bookforum, KGB Bar Lit, L.A. Review of Books, Opium, and other venues. A previous winner of the New Boston Fund Fellowship in Fiction, she was also awarded a residency at Hunt Hill Farm, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, and held informal residencies at Dorset Colony in Dorset, VT, and The Norman Mailer Writers Colony in Provincetown, MA. Banach was a long-time contributor to Harold Bloom’s literary series with Infobase Publishing. She is the author of guides to classics as well as works by contemporaries such as Salman Rushdie, Ian McEwan, Hisham Matar, E.L. Doctorow, Yann Martel, and David Mitchell, among others. Banach is a returning member of the YWC residential faculty; in 2013 she headed a fiction workshop, taught a seminar on literary discourse, and led a q&a with the New Yorker's fiction editor Deborah Treisman. 
John Crowley is a three-time winner of the World Fantasy Award, recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, author of the Aegypt Cycle, Lord Byron's Novel, and Little, Big. Ursula LeGuin described his novel Little, Big as "a splendid madness, or a delightful sanity, or both." The Washington Post Book World dubbed it "the best fantasy yet written by an American."    His most recent novel is Four Freedoms, the story of a young disabled man among many women in a WWII bomber plant in Ponca City, OK (where no bomber plant ever was.) Crowley has taught creative writing at Yale for fifteen years.
 Trey Ellis is a novelist, screenwriter, playwright, essayist, and an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of the Arts at Columbia University.  He is the author of the novels, PlatitudesHome Repairs, and the American Book Award-winning, Right Here, Right Now, as well as the memoir Bedtime Stories: Adventures in the Land of  Single-Fatherhood.  His work for the screen includes the Emmy- nominated Tuskegee Airmen, and Good Fences which was shortlisted for the PEN Award for Best Teleplay of the year.  His essays have appeared in the New York Times, Playboy, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, GQ, and Vanity Fair, and he has contributed audio commentary to NPR’s All Things Considered. His first play, Fly, was performed at the Lincoln Center Institute and later this year at Washington, D.C.’s historic Ford’s Theatre. He is also a frequent and longtime political blogger on the Huffington Post.
Marc Fitten has published opinion pieces in the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. His debut novel, Valeria's Last Stand, was published in ten countries, was an Amazon Best of the Month for May 2009, held a spot on Der Spiegel's bestseller's list for seven weeks, and was a finalist for the Exclusive Books Boeke Prize in South Africa. Booklist wrote of the book, "Evoking Gogol, Kundera, and Garcia Marquez, with a touch of Fellini for good measure, Fitten concocts a shrewdly farcical tale of the endless battle between change and tradition." His second novel, Elza's Kitchen, was released in July 2012. 
Lisa Page directs the creative writing program at George Washington University. Her nonfiction has appeared in Virginia Quarterly Review, the Washington Post Book World, Playboy, the Crisis, the Chicago Tribune and other publications. Her short stories have appeared in Phoebe and Gravity Dancers: Even More Fiction by Washington Area Women. She is  former president of the PEN/Faulkner Foundation.
Nathaniel Rich is the author of two novels: Odds Against Tomorrow, published this year by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and The Mayor's Tongue. He is a frequent contributor to the New York Times Magazine, Harper's, and the New York Review of Books.
James Scudamore is the author of three novels. The Amnesia Clinic won the 2007 Somerset Maugham Award and was shortlisted for four other prizes, including the Costa First Novel Award and the Commonwealth Writers' Prize. Heliopolis was longlisted for the 2009 Man Booker Prize. Wreaking is his most recent book. He has held two fellowships at the University Of East Anglia and is on the MFA faculty of City University Hong Kong.

 

Marian Thurm is the author of three short-story collections and six novels; her novel The Clairvoyant was a New York Times Notable Book. Her short stories have appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic, Michigan Quarterly, Boston Review, Ontario Review, and many other magazines, and have been included in Best American Short Stories and numerous other anthologies. Her books have been translated into German, Dutch, Swedish, and Japanese. She has taught creative writing at Yale, Barnard College, the Writing Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, and in the MFA programs at Columbia University and Brooklyn College.
Sergio Troncoso is the author of From This Wicked Patch of Dust, which Kirkus Reviews called "an engaging literary achievement" in a starred review.  The novel won the Southwest Book Award and was selected by Kirkus as one of the Best Books of 2012. Troncoso also wrote Crossing Borders: Personal Essays, which won the Bronze Award for Essays from ForeWord Reviews. The Portland Book Review called the collection of essays "Heartwrenching." He is also the author of The Nature of Truth, which The Chicago Tribune hailed as an "impressively lucid first thriller." Set at Yale, the novel will be republished in a revised and updated edition in 2014. Troncoso's first book The Last Tortilla and Other Stories won the Premio Aztlan Literary Prize. Publishers Weekly said, "These stories are richly satisfying." Troncoso was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters, and has served on the board of the Hudson Valley Writers' Center as well as the Literature panel for the New York State Council on the Arts. In 2013, he co-edited Our Lost Border: Essays on Life amid the Narco-Violence. His stories and essays have been featured in many anthologies and literary journals, and in 2014 Steve Inkseep from NPR's Morning Edition interviewed Troncoso and his family for a series on the United States-Mexico border.
Teddy Wayne is the author of the novels The Love Song of Jonny Valentine (Simon & Schuster) and Kapitoil (Harper Perennial), for which he was the winner of a 2011 Whiting Writers' Award and a PEN/Bingham Prize, New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award, and Dayton Literary Peace Prize finalist. The recipient of an NEA Creative Writing Fellowship, his work regularly appears in the New Yorker, the New York Times, McSweeney's, and elsewhere. He has taught at Washington University in St. Louis and Marymount Manhattan College, and he lives in New York.
Xu Xi 許素細  is a Chinese-Indonesian native of Hong Kong and the city's leading writer in English.  She is the author of nine books of fiction and essays, including Access Thirteen Tales (2011), the novel Habit of a Foreign Sky (2010), a finalist for the inaugural Man Asian Literary Prize, and Evanescent Isles: From my city-village (2008), an essay collection about life in her home city.  The New York Times named her a "pioneer writer from Asia in English" and one critic described her writing as a "new and innovative diasporic global language." She was previously on the MFA in Writing faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts and served as faculty chair from 2009-12.  In 2010, she was named Writer-in-Residence at City University of Hong Kong where she established and directs Asia's first, international low-residency MFA in Creative Writing. Please see www.xuxiwriter.com.

 Session I - Non-Fiction

Jotham Burrello is an arts entrepreneur—writer, publisher, editor, video and radio producer, and creative writing instructor at Columbia College Chicago, where he created and now directs the Publishing Lab, a resource for emerging writers, and the Review Lab, an online forum for reviewing and writing. In 2010 he founded Elephant Rock Books, an award-winning press of fiction and nonfiction. He’s the author of the eHandbook for Writers, a guide to starting a writing career, and curates the Roar Reading Series. With Janet Burroway, he co-wrote and produced the instructional DVD, So, Is It Done? Navigating the Revision Process, and Submit! The Unofficial Guide to Submitting Short Prose. His writing has appeared in literary journals and the Christian Science Monitor. He is the former editor of Sport Literate, a journal of creative nonfiction. Burrello lives (and drives a tractor) on Muddy Feet Flower Farm in Ashford, CT.
Luis H. Francia is the author of several poetry collections, including The Beauty of Ghosts, Museum of Absences, and the soon-to-be-released, Tattered Boat. His memoir, Eye of the Fish: A Personal Archipelago, won both the 2002 PEN Open Book Award and the 2002 Asian American Writers award. Other nonfiction books: a collection of essays, Memories of Overdevelopment, and A History of the Philippines: From Indios Bravos to Filipinos. RE: Reviews, Reflections, Recollections, will be published in 2014. He has been included in several anthologies, both nonfiction and poetry. He teaches creative nonfiction and poetry as part of the MFA program at City University of Hong Kong
Colleen Kinder has written essays and articles for the New Republic, Salon, National Geographic Traveler, the New York Times, Gadling, the Atlantic.com, the Wall Street Journal, Ninth Letter, A Public Space, the New York Times Magazine and Creative Nonfiction. Her essays have been anthologized in the Best American Travel Writing 2013, The Best Women's Travel Writing 2013, 20-Something Essays by 20-Something Writers, and Readings for Writers. She is the author of Delaying the Real World and founder of Off Assignment. She earned her MFA at the University of Iowa Nonfiction Writing Program and currently teaches essay and travel writing at Yale.

Session II

Biography

MG Lord is the author of Forever Barbie: The Unauthorized Biography of a Real Dolland Astro Turf: The Private Life of Rocket Science, a family memoir of aerospace culture during the Cold War. She is a frequent contributor to the NY Times Book Review; her work has appeared in Discover, the New Yorker, Los Angeles, Travel + Leisure, ArtForum and other publicationsShe has been awarded artistic residencies at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony, as well as an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation science-writing grant.  She teaches writing at USC. Her most recent book, The Accidental Feminist: How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice, won the Los Angeles Press Club Award for the best book published on an entertainment subject in 2012.  In 2013, she was a judge for the National Book Award in Nonfiction.

Children & Young Adult

Terra Elan McVoy is the author of five young adult novels, with her sixth, IN DEEP, forthcoming in July 2014. She has a Master's in Creative Writing from Florida State University, and has professional experience working as manager of a children's bookstore, an editorial assistant at a major publishing house, and as a writing coach and instructor for both young people and adults. She is currently a part-time bookseller at Little Shop of Stories in the Atlanta, GA area, where she lives with her husband. To learn more visit www.terrelan.com.

Crime Fiction and Thrillers

 Hope Dellon is an executive editor at Minotaur/St. Martin’s Press in New York. The first "adult" novel she ever read was The Seven Dials Mystery, by Agatha Christie, from her father's extensive collection of detective novels. After she graduated from Yale with a BA and an MA in English, Hope's first job in publishing was assisting the legendary mystery editor Joan Kahn, whose Harper Novels of Suspense included books by Patricia Highsmith, Dick Francis, and Tony Hillerman, and most of Dorothy L. Sayers's then-forgotten Lord Peter Wimsey series. In 1975, Hope joined St. Martin’s Press, where she has published hundreds of mysteries, including early work by Anne Perry and Diane Mott Davidson; Minette Walters's Edgar-winning novel, The Sculptress; the samurai thrillers of Laura Joh Rowland; two bestselling series by M. C. Beaton; and Louise Penny's Chief Inspector Gamache novels, including the #1 New York Times bestseller How the Light Gets In.

Cross Genre

Kirsten Bakis is the recipient of a Whiting Award, a Michener/Copernicus Society of America grant, and a Teaching/Writing Fellowship from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Her novel Lives of the Monster Dogs, a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, won the Bram Stoker Award for First Novel and was shortlisted for Britain's prestigious Orange Prize. 

Family Stories

Priscilla Gilman is a former professor of English literature at Yale and Vassar, a former literary agent at Janklow & Nesbit Associates, and the author of the acclaimed memoir The Anti-Romantic Child: A Story of Unexpected Joy (Harper, 2011, Harper Perennial 2012).  The Anti-Romantic Child was excerpted in Newsweek and featured on the cover of its international edition.  It was an NPR Morning Edition Must-Read, Slate’s Book of the Week, selected as one of the Best Books of 2011 by both The Leonard Lopate Show and the Chicago Tribune, and one of five nominees for a Books for a Better Life Award for Best First Book.  Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon and Far From the Tree, called The Anti-Romantic Child “rapturously beautiful and deeply moving, profound and marvelous.”  Gilman received her B.A. summa cum laude and her Ph.D. in English and American literature from Yale.   As a literary agent, she represented literary fiction authors including Ann Beattie, Roxana Robinson, and Lara Vapnyar, and memoirists including Dan-El Padilla Peralta, Sunny Schwartz, and Rachel Adams.  She writes personal essays and reviews fiction and literary non-fiction for the Daily Beast, the New York Times Book Review, the New York Times' Motherlode, the Chicago Tribune, MORE magazine, O: The Oprah Magazine, the Boston Globe, and Huff Post Parents. Her New York Times op-ed, “Don’t Blame Autism for Newtown,” and her August 25th 2013 New York Times Book Review Back Page Essay, "Early Reader," both went viral.  She teaches classes on literature and a private memoir workshop in New York City and is writing her second book.

 

Flash Fiction

Molly Gaudry is the author of the verse novel We Take Me Apart, which was shortlisted for the 2011 PEN/Joyce Osterweil and named 2nd finalist for the 2011 Asian American Literary Award for Poetry. Her most recent collection, Lost July, appears in the 3-author volume Frequencies, which includes a collection from Bob Hicok. She holds an MA in fiction from the University of Cincinnati, and an MFA in poetry from George Mason University. She is the creative director at The Lit Pub

Historical Fiction

 Louis Bayard’s critically acclaimed novels include Mr. Timothy, The Pale Blue Eye, The Black Tower, The School of Night and the recently released Roosevelt’s Beast (Henry Holt).  A New York Times Notable author, he has been nominated for both the Edgar and Dagger awards and, in the words of the Washington Post, has ascended to “the upper reaches of the historical thriller league.”  He is also a nationally recognized essayist and critic whose articles have appeared in the Times, the Post, the Los Angeles Times, Salon and Bookforum.

Humor

Colin McEnroe hosts the daily WNPR show, The Colin McEnroe Show. He is a weekly columnist and blogger for the Hartford Courant and a contributing editor at Men's Health and a contributor to Bicycling magazine. His own books include Swimming Chickens and Lose Weight Through Great Sex With Celebrities (the Elvis Way) -- both collections of his humor published by Doubleday -- and a memoir, My Father's Footprints, published by Warner.  His work has appeared on the New York Times Op-Ed Page and in Mirabella, Best Life, Cosmopolitan, Forbes FYI and Mademoiselle. It is not his fault that only one of those magazines still exists.  Sometimes he still can’t believe it’s not butter.

Life Stories

 Sergio Troncoso is the author of From This Wicked Patch of Dust, which Kirkus Reviews called "an engaging literary achievement" in a starred review.  The novel won the Southwest Book Award and was selected by Kirkus as one of the Best Books of 2012. Troncoso also wrote Crossing Borders: Personal Essays, which won the Bronze Award for Essays from ForeWord Reviews. The Portland Book Review called the collection of essays "Heartwrenching." He is also the author of The Nature of Truth, which The Chicago Tribune hailed as an "impressively lucid first thriller." Set at Yale, the novel will be republished in a revised and updated edition in 2014. Troncoso's first book The Last Tortilla and Other Stories won the Premio Aztlan Literary Prize. Publishers Weekly said, "These stories are richly satisfying." Troncoso was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters, and has served on the board of the Hudson Valley Writers' Center as well as the Literature panel for the New York State Council on the Arts. In 2013, he co-edited Our Lost Border: Essays on Life amid the Narco-Violence. His stories and essays have been featured in many anthologies and literary journals, and in 2014 Steve Inkseep from NPR's Morning Edition interviewed Troncoso and his family for a series on the United States-Mexico border.

 

Medicine and Science Writing

Erika Goldman is publisher and editorial director of Bellevue Literary Press (BLP), a nonprofit mission-driven publisher that has been publishing literary fiction and nonfiction at the intersection of the arts and the sciences since 2007. BLP’s books have received major literary prizes: The Sojourn by Andrew Krivak was a 2011 National Book Award finalist and 2012 winner of the first annual Chautauqua Prize and Dayton Literary Peace Prize, The Jump Artist by Austin Ratner won the 2011 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature, and the New York Times best seller Tinkers, by Paul Harding, received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize.

Memoir

                         Robin Hemley directs the Writing Program at Yale-NUS College in Singapore and is the author of ten books of nonfiction and fiction and the winner of many awards including a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship, The Nelson Algren Award for Fiction from the Chicago Tribune, The Story Magazine Humor Prize, as well as three Pushcart Prizes in both fiction and nonfiction, and many others.  His memoir, Nola: A Memoir of Faith, Art, and Madness was reissued by The University of Iowa Press in 2013.  He is the founder and organizer of NonfictioNow a biennial conference that will convene next at Northern Arizona University in October of 2015.    

Playwriting

Amy Herzog’s plays include After the Revolution (Williamstown Theater Festival; Playwrights Horizons; Lilly Award), 4000 Miles (Lincoln Center; Obie Award for the Best New American Play, Pulitzer Prize Finalist), The Great God Pan (Playwrights Horizons), and Belleville (Yale Rep; New York Theatre Workshop; Susan Smith Blackburn Prize Finalist; Drama Desk Nomination). Amy is a recipient of the Whiting Writers Award, the Benjamin H. Danks Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Helen Merrill, the Joan and Joseph Cullman Award for Extraordinary Creativity, and the New York Times Outstanding Playwright Award. She is a Usual Suspect at NYTW and an alumna of Youngblood, Play Group at Ars Nova, and the SoHo Rep Writer/Director Lab. She has taught playwriting at Bryn Mawr and Yale.  MFA, Yale School of Drama.

 

Poetry

David Gorin's poetry and criticism have appeared in A Public Space, The Believer, Boston Review, Best New Poets 2011, The Claudius App, Jacket, and elsewhere. He is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony residency, a 2005-2006 Dorot Fellowship, and a Teaching and Writing Fellowship from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, from which he holds an MFA in poetry. At present, he is a PhD student in English at Yale University, and curates the WAVEMACHINE reading series in New Haven, Connecticut. He is at work on a poetry manuscript and a dissertation entitled Lyric Poetry After Lyric Poetry, on American poetry after 1980, and writes a monthly column on poetry for the Boston Review online.
StephanieHartholds a BA in English from Barnard College and an MFA in Poetry from the Writing Division of the School of the Arts at Columbia University. She has studied with poets Allen Ginsberg, Derek Walcott, and Daniel Halpern, among others. She has many years of teaching experience, including nearly 20 years at Yale’s English Language Institute. Currently, she is Professor of English at Housatonic Community College in Bridgeport, CT,

 

Poetry for Prose Writers

Richard Jackson teaches at UT-Chattanooga and is a frequent lecturer at the  MFA writing seminars at Vermont College, University of Iowa Summer Writers’ Festival, and the Prague Summer Program. He is the author of ten books of poems most recently, Resonance ( 2010) (Eric Hocher Award), and forthcoming Out Of Place, as well as Half Lives: Petrarchan Poems (2004) and Unauthorized Autobiography: New and Selected Poems (2003). He has also published two books of translations, Last Voyage: The Poems of Giovanni Pascoli from Italian (2010) and Alexandar Persolja’s Journey of the Sun from Slovene (2008).  He is also the author of two critical books, Acts of Mind: Conversations with American Poets (Choice Award) and Dismantling Time in Contemporary Poetry (Agee Award Winner), and has edited two anthologies of Slovene poetry, as well as the journal Poetry Miscellany. His work has been translated into fifteen languages and has appeared in The Best American Poems, among other collections. He has been awarded the Order of Freedom Medal by the President of Slovenia for literary and humanitarian work in the Balkans, and has been named a Guggenheim Fellow, Fulbright Fellow, Witter-Bynner Fellow, NEA fellow, NEH Fellow, and has lectured and given readings at dozens of universities and conferences here and abroad. In 2009 he won the AWP George Garret National Award for Teaching and Arts Advocacy. His web page is at http://members.authorsguild.net/svobodni/

 

Revision

Jotham Burrello is an arts entrepreneur—writer, publisher, editor, video and radio producer, and creative writing instructor at Columbia College Chicago, where he created and now directs the Publishing Lab, a resource for emerging writers, and the Review Lab, an online forum for reviewing and writing. In 2010 he founded Elephant Rock Books, an award-winning press of fiction and nonfiction. He’s the author of the eHandbook for Writers, a guide to starting a writing career, and curates the Roar Reading Series. With Janet Burroway, he co-wrote and produced the instructional DVD, So, Is It Done? Navigating the Revision Process, and Submit! The Unofficial Guide to Submitting Short Prose. His writing has appeared in literary journals and the Christian Science Monitor. He is the former editor of Sport Literate, a journal of creative nonfiction. Burrello lives (and drives a tractor) on Muddy Feet Flower Farm in Ashford, CT.

Science Fiction and Fantasy

John Crowley is a three-time winner of the World Fantasy Award, recipient of an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award for Literature, author of the Aegypt Cycle, Lord Byron's Novel, and Little, Big. Ursula LeGuin described his novel Little, Big as "a splendid madness, or a delightful sanity, or both." The Washington Post Book World dubbed it "the best fantasy yet written by an American."    His most recent novel is Four Freedoms, the story of a young disabled man among many women in a WWII bomber plant in Ponca City, OK (where no bomber plant ever was.) Crowley has taught creative writing at Yale for fifteen years.
 Jeff VanderMeer is a three-time winner, thirteen-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award. His Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative Fiction, the world's first full-color, image-based writing guide, is now out from Abrams Image. His Southern Reach trilogy (Annihilation, Authority, Acceptance) will be published by FSG, HarperCollins Canada, and The Fourth Estate (UK) in 2014, as well as 12 other countries. The film rights have been optioned by Scott Rudin Productions and Paramount Pictures. Prior novels include the Ambergris Cycle (City of Saints & Madmen, Shriek: An Afterword, and Finch) and Veniss Underground. His short fiction has appeared in American Fantastic Tales (Library of America), Conjunctions, and many others. He writes nonfiction for The Washington Post, the LA Times, The Guardian, and many others. He has lectured at MIT and the Library of Congress and helps run the Shared Worlds teen SF/Fantasy writing camp out of Wofford College. With his wife Ann he has coedited several iconic anthologies, most recently The Time Traveler's Almanac and The Weird. 
 Ann VanderMeer currently serves as an acquiring fiction editor for Tor.com, Cheeky Frawg Books, and weirdfictionreview.com. She was the editor-in-chief for Weird Tales for five years, during which time she was nominated three times for the Hugo Award, winning one. Along with nominations for the Shirley Jackson Award, she also has won a World Fantasy Award and a British Fantasy Award for co-editing The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories. Other projects have included Best American Fantasy, three Steampunk anthologies, and a humor book, The Kosher Guide to Imaginary Animals. Her latest anthology is The Time Traveler’s Almanac, and an as-yet unnamed anthology of feminist speculative fiction.

 

Screenwriting

Trey Ellis is a novelist, screenwriter, playwright, essayist, and an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of the Arts at Columbia University.  He is the author of the novels, PlatitudesHome Repairs, and the American Book Award-winning, Right Here, Right Now, as well as the memoir Bedtime Stories: Adventures in the Land of  Single-Fatherhood.  His work for the screen includes the Emmy- nominated Tuskegee Airmen, and Good Fences which was shortlisted for the PEN Award for Best Teleplay of the year.  His essays have appeared in the New York Times, Playboy, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, GQ, and Vanity Fair, and he has contributed audio commentary to NPR’s All Things Considered. His first play, Fly, was performed at the Lincoln Center Institute and later this year at Washington, D.C.’s historic Ford’s Theater. He is also a frequent and longtime political blogger on the HuffingtonPost.

Travel and Food Writing

Corby Kummer is a senior editor at the Atlantic, where he has worked since 1981. A frequent commentator on television and radio, Kummer has also served since 1997 as restaurant critic for Boston magazine and writes for many other magazines. His books include The Joy of Coffee and The Pleasures of Slow Food.

 Writing for Television

Richard Kramer is the award-winning writer/producer/director of such shows as thirtysomething, My So-Called Life, Once and Again, and Tales of the City.  He spent four years in Silliman College many, many years ago. At the end of 2012, he published his first novel These Things Happen, which he is presently adapting for television.
 Stephen Tolkin trained as an architect at Yale. After a year of drafting plumbing details in various glamorous offices on two continents, he gave it all up and went into the family business of writing in Hollywood. He has created four network series, including WB’s Summerland; written and produced Brothers & Sisters and TNT’s current hit series Perception; and written and directed miniseries and cable movies for Lifetime (starring Gena Rowlands), USA (Christine Lahti), HBO (Cuba Gooding Jr.), and Showtime (Gael Garcia Bernal).

Yale and New Haven:

Accommodation & Facilities

Writers and faculty alike will live in one of Yale’s  residential colleges. They will share breakfast and lunch in the dining hall. The food features organic and locally sourced selections and a wide variety of choices at each meal. Bedrooms are single occupancy but share a common living space and bathroom with writers of the same gender. Please bear in mind that even though it is a striking setting, it is a college dorm and not a hotel. Writers who prefer air conditioning and housekeeping services should consider staying in one of the local hotels that have offered our participants a discount.

While breakfast and lunch are included in tuition, dinner is on your own. We  encourage you to explore downtown New Haven and its dozens of excellent restaurants.

Our writers have access to the entire Yale campus. This includes one of the world’s largest gymnasiums as well as some of the country’s largest libraries. The Yale Art Gallery, including its recently renovated sculpture hall, was renowned architect Louis Khan’s first major commission; his last, the British Art Center, is directly across the street. 

 

APPLY HERE

Applications received by April 30 – Decisions made by May 16

Total conference  size is limited to one hundred and thirty.

In Session I, each workshop will be limited to ten writers. The master class is limited to twenty-five. Each section in Session II includes no more than twelve writers

Admissions are based solely on the writing sample. The writing sample needs to accompany your application for admission, and may be uploaded electronically. It should be about thirteen hundred words.  Please single space your writing using a 12 pt. font as a Word or PDF document. Each page must include your name.   

Once accepted, an applicant is not considered registered until payment has been received. We accept payment through both check and PayPal.

Writers are assigned to workshops and master classes in the order in which they register. While we will make every effort to honor your faculty preference, we cannot guarantee it, because we can’t assign you to a workshop that has been filled. We will, however, announce the closing of a workshop immediately on our website to give you an opportunity to make another selection.

You can apply for either or both Sessions I and II.

Applicants must be 18 years old by the start of the program.

 

Costs: 

June 7 - June 17

Session 1 (Living in residential college): $2600

Session 1 (Not living in residential college): $2025
 

June 18 - June 22

Session 2 (Living in residential college): $1150

Session 2 (Not living in residential college): $900

 

June 7 - June 22

Both Sessions (Living in residential college): $3850

Both Sessions (Not living in residential college): $2960


Only credit cards are accepted for the application fee. Upon acceptance the program fees can be paid via credit card or check. Check should be made payable to Yale University and mailed to Yale University, PO Box 208355, New Haven, CT 06510. If paying by credit card, you will be charged within a few days of registration.  Program fees are due in full within two weeks of acceptance or your space may be forfeited. We will refund 75% for cancellation requests received by April 15, 2014 and 50% for cancellation requests received by May 15, 2014.   We will be unable to honor refund requests after then.