Career Strategy Fellowships Study Abroad Summer Session MyYSS

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Experience a Course with Yale in the Summer

Our application is now open. 

YSS admits students on a rolling basis. As soon as courses are filled, they are closed to further enrollments.

Studying at Yale gives students a newfound appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Some courses have pre-requisites.  To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course. If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students. Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session

Pin: Course Syllabi

Use the link below to reference available syllabi, please do not use the links in the course descriptions. 

2021 Course Syllabi

Auditing

Auditing is permitted in select online courses only. More information for course auditing can be found on the online course information page.

Summer 2021 Courses 

Note: The Chemistry labs (S134, S136, S222, S223) and ART S130 may also offer an in-person option for Yale students who will be living on or near campus if the public health situation permits. Details of the in-person option will be communicated to students enrolled in those courses closer to the start of the summer.

Use the search function below to view courses offered online this summer. 

Please review important information about online courses.

Summer 2021 Dates

Date: Session A:
June 7 - July 9, 2021

Session B:
July 12 - August 13, 2021

Our application is now open. 

African American Autobiography

AFAM S305 (CRN: 30019)

Online Course. Examination of African American autobiography, from slave narratives to contemporary memoirs, and how the genre approaches the project (and problem) of knowing, through reading, the relationships of fellow humans. Chronological consideration of a range of narratives and their representations of race, of space, of migration, of violence, of self, and of other, as well as the historical circumstances that inform these representations. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Plantation, Prison, and Ghetto in the United States

AFAM S385 (CRN: 30021)

Online Course. Survey of the plantation, ghetto, and prison. Three spatial forms as foundations for the American project, aligned with colonialism and domination. Theoretical and historical considerations of how production of space and racial differences have been articulated together in United States. Topics include political economy of slavery, ghetto origins, and prison abolition. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Society and Politics of North Africa

AFST S235 (CRN: 30269)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. The Maghrib – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya – has historically been a critical frontier zone linking Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This crossroads remains strategically important with issues such as sub-Saharan and North African migration, political Islam, Arab-Berber identities, terrorism and counter-terrorism, the Sahara question, and Mediterranean trade relationships current international concerns. This course provides a thorough overview of North African history, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism, political systems and opposition, Islam in North Africa, and the Maghrib in the 21st century. Applicants choose AFST, GLBL, HIST, MMES, or SOCY credit. Prerequisite: None. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

African Urban Cultures

AFST S334 (CRN: 30384)

Online Course. This seminar aims to explore how socially-constructed notions of space, time, and the city inform African urban theory, practice, and cultures. This course will first delineate methods of visual sociology and explore how postcolonial theory challenges Western concepts of contemporary urban cultures throughout Africa. As spaces with complex colonial legacies and transnational connections, this course will introduce students to a visual sociology of a rich collection of cultural artifacts such as film, photography, and visual art. These are used to research the cultural politics of urban life in Cape Town (South Africa), Lagos (Nigeria), Swakopmund (Namibia), and Johannesburg (South Africa). 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Race and Gender in Asian American Popular Culture

AMST S251 (CRN: 30140)

Online Course. Asian American popular culture thought through the shifting histories and ideologies that give it meaning. Considers the changing ideas of "Asian American" as a raced and gendered category that both represents and makes culture. Readings cover a variety of popular genres including film, television, music, and digital technologies. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Race, Sports, and Social Change

AMST S252 (CRN: 30024)

Online Course. Examines a broad range of sporting sites—from public protests by professional athletes to debates about sports mascots to recreational and amateur sports leagues—to explore themes of political formation, domination, and resistance in the US. Considers the ways that athletes, political figures, and social movements have made use of sports to shape particular visions of rights, freedom, and democracy. Readings are drawn from across the humanities and social sciences, including Black Studies, critical race theory, cultural studies, and critical sports studies. Includes guest speakers, journalists, and filmmakers. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Plantation, Prison, and Ghetto in the United States

AMST S303 (CRN: 30365)

Online Course. Survey of the plantation, ghetto, and prison. Three spatial forms as foundations for the American project, aligned with colonialism and domination. Theoretical and historical considerations of how production of space and racial differences have been articulated together in United States. Topics include political economy of slavery, ghetto origins, and prison abolition. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Introduction to Transgender Studies

AMST S314 (CRN: 30286)

Online Course. Introduction to transgender studies, an emergent field that draws on gender studies, queer theory, sociology, feminist science studies, literary studies, and history. Representations of gender nonconformity in a cultural context dominated by a two-sex model of human gender differentiation. Sources include novels, autobiographies, films, and philosophy and criticism. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

The Hollywood Novel and the Hollywood Movie

AMST S321 (CRN: 30088)

Online Course. This course surveys the “Hollywood novel” and the “Hollywood film,” exploring how literary and visual texts turn their gaze back onto Hollywood itself––the “dream factory” of the United States. We begin with the emergence of cinema and conclude with a survey of recent (c.2000––) films about Hollywood which, in the post-studio era, frequently approach the elegiac or nostalgic (The Artist, 2011; La La Land, 2016), the horrific (Mulholland Drive, 2001), or the tragic (Maps to the Stars, 2014). Books range from F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon, Harold Robbins' The Dream Merchants, Dorothy Hughes' In a Lonely Place, Gore Vidal's Myra Breckenridge, and Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Food, Race, and Migration in United States Society

AMST S372 (CRN: 30082)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Exploration of the relationship between food, race, and migration in historical and contemporary United States contexts. Organized thematically and anchored in selected case studies, this course is comparative in scope and draws from contemporary work in the fields of food studies, ethnic studies, migration studies, American studies, anthropology, and history. Enrollment limited to 18 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Film, Video, and American History

AMST S483 (CRN: 30092)

Online Course. This course looks at American history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the lens of film and video. Students will learn to analyze fiction and nonfiction moving pictures in the context of social and cultural history. Emphasis will be placed on using films and videos as historical sources. Topics will include: The Great Migration, The Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, September 11th, and contemporary activist movements. Screenings will include feature films such as Within Our Gates, Sullivan’s Travels, Casablanca, Night of the Living Dead, and Selma. This course seeks to expand students' knowledge of the history of American film, culture, and society. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

ANTH S110 (CRN: 30026)

Online Course. Anthropological study of cosmology, tacit knowledge, and ways of knowing the world in specific social settings. Ways in which sociocultural specificity helps to explain human solutions to problems of cooperation and conflict, production and reproduction, expression, and belief. Introduction to anthropological ways of understanding cultural difference in approaches to sickness and healing, gender and sexuality, economics, religion, and communication. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Scientific Thinking and Reasoning

ANTH S118 (CRN: 30343)

Online Course. Students read, discuss and reflect on the paramount importance of science and quantitative reasoning in their lives through an exploration of the basic elements of a quantitative scientific process of inquiry. The goal of the course is to introduce students to foundational topics in science that must be, but sometimes are not, thoroughly considered early in the process of scientific inquiry. Students who have taken ANTH 018, may not enroll in this course. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Ancient Civilizations of Mesoamerica

ANTH S233 (CRN: 30288)

Online Course. An exploration of the archaeology of the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and other peoples of ancient Mesoamerica, with emphasis on current debates and queries. Students will be introduced to new discoveries aided by scientific methods, theoretical and methodological insights, and advances in the interpretation of writing and symbolic systems that challenge traditional interpretations. The course also explores the links with contemporary peoples in Mexico and Central America, who still preserve significant aspects of ancient Mesoamerican cultural traditions. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Feminist & Queer Ethnographies: Dystopia, Catastrophe, Extinction

ANTH S308 (CRN: 30369)

Online Course. This seminar centers the analytics and methods that feminist and queer ethnographic analyses have brought to the fore to revisit a cluster of topical issues, this year assembled around the theme: Dystopia, Catastrophe, Extinction. Key to the overall class will be the relation between humans and the world and, in particular, the way in which different “ends of the world” configure humankind as an entity to whom the world belongs. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Race, Inequality, and Urban Education and Housing Policy

ANTH S324 (CRN: 30060)

Online Course. Blends urban history with educational and housing policy to explore how spatial relationships have shaped opportunity since the groundbreaking supreme court decision, Brown V. Board of Education. Investigates a range of historical, legal, and contemporary issues relevant to both the segregation and desegregation of American cities and their public schools in the twentieth century. Uses Atlanta, GA as a case study in how race, cities, schools and space have been differently understood in the South as compared to the North, and to Atlanta as compared to other “Deep South” cities. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

The Anthropology of Possible Worlds

ANTH S423 (CRN: 30027)

Online Course. This course focuses on the nature of possible worlds: literary worlds (Narnia), ideological worlds (the world according to a particular political stance), psychological worlds (what someone remembers to be the case, wishes to be the case, or believes to be the case), environmental worlds (possible environmental futures), virtual worlds (the World of Warcraft), and—most of all—ethnographic works in which the actual and possible worlds of others are represented (the world according to the ancient Maya). We don’t focus on the contents of such worlds per se, but rather on the range of resources people have for representing, regimenting, and residing in such worlds; and the roles such resources play in mediating social relations and cultural values. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Global Health Ethnography

ANTH S462 (CRN: 30028)

Online Course. Study of anthropological ethnographies on serious health problems facing populations in resource-poor societies. Poverty and structural violence; struggles with infectious disease; the health of women and children; human rights and medical humanitarianism. Focus on sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia, and the Middle East. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Human Osteology

ANTH S464 (CRN: 30029)

Online Course. A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Climate Change, Societal Collapse and Resilience

ANTH S473 (CRN: 30084)

Online Course. The coincidence of societal collapses throughout history with decadal and century-scale abrupt climate change events. Challenges to anthropological and historical paradigms of cultural adaptation and resilience. Examination of archaeological and historical records and high-resolution sets of paleoclimate proxies. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

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