Career Strategy Fellowships Study Abroad Summer Session MyYSS

Courses at Yale

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Experience a Course with Yale in the Summer

Studying at Yale gives students a newfound appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Classroom locations are available here.

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Online courses are marked as such in the course description. If there is no indication, the course is offered in-person. 
  • Some courses have pre-requisites. To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course. If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students. Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session
  • All courses are in Eastern Daylight Time (UTC -4)

Pin: Course Syllabi

2023 course syllabi will begin to be posted in March. You may use the below list of syllabi from last summer as a reference.

2022 Course Syllabi

Summer 2023 Dates

Date: Session A:
May 29 - June 30, 2023

Session B:
July 3 - August 4, 2023

African American Autobiography

AFAM S305 (CRN: 30001)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Examination of African American autobiography, from slave narratives to contemporary memoirs, and how the genre approaches the project (and problem) of knowing, through reading, the relationships of fellow humans. Chronological consideration of a range of narratives and their representations of race, of space, of migration, of violence, of self, and of other, as well as the historical circumstances that inform these representations. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5. (View syllabus)

The Black Radical Tradition

AFAM S310 (CRN: 30321)

Course cancelled. In-person Course. Beginning with the ruptures of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism in Africa, this course traces major intellectual currents and liberation movements in the history of Black radicalism in Africa and the African diaspora. It proceeds by foregrounding the multiplicities of Blackness as a lived experience and political identity. Moving between local, hemispheric, and global perspectives, the course will explore the social and political contexts in which African and Afro-diasporic movements developed, and the ways in which they negotiated structures of racial/colonial power. By means of readings and discussion, we will consider a range of movements and ideas, including African anti-colonialism, slave revolts in the Americas, Black Reconstruction, the U.S. Black Freedom Movement, Black feminism, and Third Worldism, among others. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5.  (View syllabus)

Geographies of Freedom: Race, Space, and Gender in the Caribbean

AFAM S312 (CRN: 30322)

Online Course. An examination of configurations of space and place in Caribbean thought. We will explore how space and place have been represented, constructed, and imagined in literary and theoretical texts. We will focus on issues concerning the transatlantic slave trade, colonization, and the postcolony, with particular attention to race, gender, and sexuality. Main topics include imperial conquest, the plantation, the slave ship, the Black Atlantic, the ocean, fugitivity, the urban, indenture, nature, tourism, and diaspora. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

Race, Gender, and Class Inequities in the U.S.

AFAM S348 (CRN: 30341)

In-person Course. What are race, gender, and class? How do they operate individually or collectively to shape contemporary inequities? This course investigates these questions and the diverse methodological and theoretical approaches that scholars have taken to highlight matters affecting Black people and racially-minoritized populations in the United States. Likewise, it examines how persisting inequities are observed and experienced in the domains of education, employment, population health, food access, housing, incarceration, and policing, among others. No previous background in Sociology or any social science discipline is assumed. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1.  (View syllabus)

Plantation, Prison, and Ghetto in the United States

AFAM S385 (CRN: 30003)

Online Course. Survey of the plantation, ghetto, and prison. Three spatial forms as foundations for the American project, aligned with colonialism and domination. Theoretical and historical considerations of how production of space and racial differences have been articulated together in United States. Topics include political economy of slavery, ghetto origins, and prison abolition. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5. (View syllabus)

Social Dimensions of Evolution in Africa: The Cradle Paradox

AFST S200 (CRN: 30201)

Course Cancelled. Africa as the cradle of humanity is a widely accepted theory in scientific studies. Elsewhere nationalist archaeology has been used to bolster nationalism and facilitate state building. Africans, while embracing their recent history, have a marked disconnect to the cradle paradigm. A paradox thus arises out of the fact that the cradle of humanity status of Africa appears to hold no special place in the psyche of most of its inhabitants. This course examines symbolism, colonialism, poverty, media, literacy, and religion as agencies that distance the ‘humanity cradle’ status of Africa from nationalist and identity discourses. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

The Black Radical Tradition

AFST S310 (CRN: 30367)

Course cancelled. In-person Course. Beginning with the ruptures of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and European colonialism in Africa, this course traces major intellectual currents and liberation movements in the history of Black radicalism in Africa and the African diaspora. It proceeds by foregrounding the multiplicities of Blackness as a lived experience and political identity. Moving between local, hemispheric, and global perspectives, the course will explore the social and political contexts in which African and Afro-diasporic movements developed, and the ways in which they negotiated structures of racial/colonial power. By means of readings and discussion, we will consider a range of movements and ideas, including African anti-colonialism, slave revolts in the Americas, Black Reconstruction, the U.S. Black Freedom Movement, Black feminism, and Third Worldism, among others. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5.  (View syllabus)

Society and Politics of North Africa

AFST S325 (CRN: 30279)

This course is part of a Yale Summer Session Program Abroad and cannot be taken independent of the program. Interested students must apply to Yale Study Abroad by February 15. For more detailed information about the program, including a description of the courses, housing, excursions, and budget, visit: http://studyabroad.yale.edu/programs/society-politics-north-africa. (View syllabus)

Visual Approaches to Global Health

AFST S350 (CRN: 30249)

This course is part of a Yale Summer Session Program Abroad and cannot be taken independent of the program. Interested students must apply to Yale Study Abroad by February 15. For more detailed information about the program, including a description of the courses, housing, excursions, and budget, visit: https://studyabroad.yale.edu/programs/yale-summer-session-johannesburg. (View syllabus)

What is Law?

AMST S221 (CRN: 30374)

In-person Course. As an introductory class both to the main principles and topics of legal thought and practice, and to cultural criticism, the class will use works of literature, theatre, film and music to acquaint with the field of law, and vice versa. Students will learn in what ways culture has shaped the law, and, in turn, how law governs and shapes culture. Topics include being a person on Instagram and Facebook; Black Lives Matter, the US Constitution; Freedom of Speech, “Calling out” and “Cancel Culture”; Interpretation and Authority; Law, Ethics and Religion; Islam, Nazi Dictatorship and Totalitarianism, The Trump Administration; Criminal Law, Agency and Multiple Personality Disorder; Sampling and Copyright, Hip Hop/Rap in the courtroom.1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5.  (View syllabus)

Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Asian American Popular Culture

AMST S251 (CRN: 30132)

Online Course. From film, TV, and social media to the fringe punk scenes in between, this course explores the politics of contemporary “Asian American” popular cultures. What are the relationships between modern politics and consumption, between social movements and cultural media? Using critical race, feminist, and queer studies methods, we consider the tense intersections between consumer cultures, media technologies, global Asian/American markets, and resistant social movements. We ask historical questions about power, representation, capital, and access, all with close attention to shifting categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, and trans/nationalism. Ultimately, popular cultures—the radical, the joyful, and the terrible—will be our guide.  1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5. (View syllabus)

Geographies of Freedom: Race, Space, and Gender in the Caribbean

AMST S310 (CRN: 30370)

Online Course. An examination of configurations of space and place in Caribbean thought. We will explore how space and place have been represented, constructed, and imagined in literary and theoretical texts. We will focus on issues concerning the transatlantic slave trade, colonization, and the postcolony, with particular attention to race, gender, and sexuality. Main topics include imperial conquest, the plantation, the slave ship, the Black Atlantic, the ocean, fugitivity, the urban, indenture, nature, tourism, and diaspora. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Transgender Studies

AMST S314 (CRN: 30005)

Online Course. Introduction to transgender studies, an emergent field that draws on gender studies, queer theory, sociology, feminist science studies, literary studies, and history. Representations of gender nonconformity in a cultural context dominated by a two-sex model of human gender differentiation. Sources include novels, autobiographies, films, and philosophy and criticism. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

Race and Comedy in the United States

AMST S317 (CRN: 30319)

In-person Course. Introduction to theories of the ludic and to critical race theory. Ways in which comic modes have been utilized by racialized subjects to represent and issue critiques of the dominant culture. Analysis of stand-up comedy, film, television, and novels. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

Food, Race, and Migration in United States Society

AMST S372 (CRN: 30073)

Course Cancelled. In-person Course. Exploration of the relationship between food, race, and migration in historical and contemporary United States contexts. Organized thematically and anchored in selected case studies, this course is comparative in scope and draws from contemporary work in the fields of food studies, ethnic studies, migration studies, American studies, anthropology, and history. Enrollment limited to 18 students. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1.

Film, Video, and American History

AMST S483 (CRN: 30084)

In-person Course. This course looks at American history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the lens of film and video. Students will learn to analyze fiction and nonfiction moving pictures in the context of social and cultural history. Emphasis will be placed on using films and videos as historical sources. Topics will include: The Great Migration, The Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, September 11th, and contemporary activist movements. Screenings will include feature films such as Within Our Gates, Sullivan’s Travels, Casablanca, Night of the Living Dead, and Selma. This course seeks to expand students' knowledge of the history of American film, culture, and society. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

ANTH S110 (CRN: 30007)

In-person Course. Anthropological study of cosmology, tacit knowledge, and ways of knowing the world in specific social settings. Ways in which sociocultural specificity helps to explain human solutions to problems of cooperation and conflict, production and reproduction, expression, and belief. Introduction to anthropological ways of understanding cultural difference in approaches to sickness and healing, gender and sexuality, economics, religion, and communication. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session B: July 4 - August 5. (View syllabus)

Social Dimensions of Evolution in Africa: The Cradle Paradox

ANTH S200 (CRN: 30307)

Course Cancelled. Africa as the cradle of humanity is a widely accepted theory in scientific studies. Elsewhere nationalist archaeology has been used to bolster nationalism and facilitate state building. Africans, while embracing their recent history, have a marked disconnect to the cradle paradigm. A paradox thus arises out of the fact that the cradle of humanity status of Africa appears to hold no special place in the psyche of most of its inhabitants. This course examines symbolism, colonialism, poverty, media, literacy, and religion as agencies that distance the ‘humanity cradle’ status of Africa from nationalist and identity discourses. 1 Credit. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

Feminist & Queer Ethnographies: Dystopia, Catastrophe, Extinction

ANTH S308 (CRN: 30134)

Online Course. This seminar centers the analytics and methods that feminist and queer ethnographic analyses have brought to the fore to revisit a cluster of topical issues, this year assembled around the theme: Dystopia, Catastrophe, Extinction. Key to the overall class will be the relation between humans and the world and, in particular, the way in which different “ends of the world” configure humankind as an entity to whom the world belongs. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1.  (View syllabus)

Race, Inequality, and Urban Education and Housing Policy

ANTH S324 (CRN: 30051)

Online Course. Blends urban history with educational and housing policy to explore how spatial relationships have shaped opportunity since the groundbreaking supreme court decision, Brown V. Board of Education. Investigates a range of historical, legal, and contemporary issues relevant to both the segregation and desegregation of American cities and their public schools in the twentieth century. Uses Atlanta, GA as a case study in how race, cities, schools and space have been differently understood in the South as compared to the North, and to Atlanta as compared to other “Deep South” cities. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,650. Session A: May 30 - July 1. (View syllabus)

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