Career Strategy Fellowships Study Abroad Summer Session MyYSS

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Experience a Course with Yale in the Summer

Studying at Yale gives students a newfound appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Some courses have pre-requisites.  To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course. If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students. Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session

Pin: Course Syllabi

2022 course syllabi will begin to be posted in March. You may use the below list of syllabi from last summer as a reference. 

2021 Course Syllabi

Summer 2021 Courses 

Note: Summer 2022 Courses will be posted by mid-January. Please use the 2021 course list below for a good idea of the breadth and types of courses that will likely be offered in 2022.

Use the search function below to view courses offered online. 

Please review important information about online courses.

Summer 2022 Dates

Date: Session A:
May 30 - July 1, 2022

Session B:
July 4 - August 5, 2022

Energy, Environment, and Public Policy

EVST S121 (CRN: 30039)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Seminar that covers the technology, use, and impact of energy on the environment, climate, security, and the economy. Emphasis on what drives people's choices and how to transition to renewable energy.  Prerequisite: a strong background in high school physics, chemistry, and mathematics. Enrollment limited to 24 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Global Climate Governance

EVST S234 (CRN: 30303)

Course Cancelled. Online Course. This seminar provides an overview of global climate governance, incl. overarching conceptual frameworks, a variety of empirical subdomains, interlinkages with other policy fields, and central challenges encountered in global climate governance.  Using a portfolio approach to examinations, students will prepare a range of individual and group assignments throughout the semester. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Policy Analysis & Program Design for Justice & Sustainability

EVST S253 (CRN: 30304)

Online Course. The study of policy problems with implications for justice or sustainability frames essential readings in policy theory and program design, policy analysis, implementation research, and program design and evaluation. Students gain insight on applying theories and principles of policy and program design to ‘real world’ problems by reading and discussing cases in environmental justice and sustainability and by the study of problems in justice or sustainability of their own choosing. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Wetlands Ecology Conservation & Management

EVST S323 (CRN: 30372)

Online Course. Wetlands are ubiquitous. Collectively they cover 370,000 square miles in the United States and globally encompass more than 5 million square miles. Most points on a map are less than 1 km from the nearest wetland. Yet wetlands are nearly invisible to most people. In this course we explore wetlands in all of their dimensions, including the critical services they provide to other systems, the rich biodiversity they harbor, their impact on global climate, and the links by which they connect to other systems. Additionally, wetlands are lynchpin environments for scientific policy and regulation. The overarching aim of the course is to connect what we know about wetlands from a scientific perspective to the ways in which wetlands matter for people. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Environmental Law & Governance

EVST S355E (CRN: 30345)

Course cancelled. Online Course. This course explores the purposes and effectiveness of diverse environmental laws including those that pertain to: climate change, energy, national security, food and agriculture, environmental justice, air and water pollution, hazardous wastes & sites, toxic commercial chemicals, and environmentally infectious diseases such as Covid-19 and malaria. Diverse types of law will be considered that apply to each of the challenges above. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B:  July 12 - August 13.

Climate Change, Societal Collapse and Resilience

EVST S473 (CRN: 30083)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. The coincidence of societal collapses throughout history with decadal and century-scale abrupt climate change events. Challenges to anthropological and historical paradigms of cultural adaptation and resilience. Examination of archaeological and historical records and high-resolution sets of paleoclimate proxies. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Chinese Cinema Survey: 1980–Present

FILM S142 (CRN: 30057)

Online Course. Surveys key figures, movements, and trends in Sinophone cinema since 1980. Sessions will be structured around ten films, each an entry point into a broader topic, such as the Fifth and Sixth Generation directors; the Hong Kong New Wave; Taiwan New Cinema; martial arts film; commercial blockbuster; and independent documentary. Directors of interest include Jia Zhangke, Zhang Yimou, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-Wai, Ann Hui, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Tsai Ming-Liang, Ou Ning, and Feng Xiaogang. We will examine their films formally, through shot-by-shot analysis, as well as in relation to major social, political, and economic developments in recent Chinese history. We will also consider pertinent questions of propaganda and censorship; aesthetics and politics; history and memory; transnational networks and audiences; and what constitutes "Chineseness" in a globalized world. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

The Hollywood Novel and the Hollywood Movie

FILM S180 (CRN: 30087)

Online Course. This course surveys the “Hollywood novel” and the “Hollywood film,” exploring how literary and visual texts turn their gaze back onto Hollywood itself––the “dream factory” of the United States. We begin with the emergence of cinema and conclude with a survey of recent (c.2000––) films about Hollywood which, in the post-studio era, frequently approach the elegiac or nostalgic (The Artist, 2011; La La Land, 2016), the horrific (Mulholland Drive, 2001), or the tragic (Maps to the Stars, 2014). Books range from F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Last Tycoon, Harold Robbins' The Dream Merchants, Dorothy Hughes' In a Lonely Place, Gore Vidal's Myra Breckenridge, and Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Sports and Media

FILM S188 (CRN: 30089)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. A study of the interrelations among popular sport, cinema, television, radio, print, and social media. Explores topics of identity, commerce, and civics through contemporary texts (Hunger Games, Senna, Invictus), and introduces the history of sport in media culture. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Money and Media: the Business of Hollywood

FILM S208E (CRN: 30159)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. An examination of the key events and ideas that shape the modern motion picture business from financial, institutional, and historical standpoints. Topics include ways that the business has evolved in response to changes in technology, distribution, and competition; how the business dictates what ends up on screen; and relationships among studios, actors, agents, independent filmmakers, distributors, and the viewing audience. Industry practitioners discuss special topics. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Film, Video, and American History

FILM S247 (CRN: 30090)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. This course looks at American history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the lens of film and video. Students will learn to analyze fiction and nonfiction moving pictures in the context of social and cultural history. Emphasis will be placed on using films and videos as historical sources. Topics will include: The Great Migration, The Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, September 11th, and contemporary activist movements. Screenings will include feature films such as Within Our Gates, Sullivan’s Travels, Casablanca, Night of the Living Dead, and Selma. This course seeks to expand students' knowledge of the history of American film, culture, and society. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Peak Television

FILM S348E (CRN: 30306)

Online Course. Spurred on by rapid technological and cultural change, television content and business forms have evolved dramatically in the past twenty years. Digital media has absorbed television into a broader category of serialized content that is now intermediated by all manners of consumptive platforms and delivery systems. Today, legacy broadcast networks, cable television, transactional and subscription services all compete side-by-side in a fragile equilibrium, each pursuing viewer attention and cultural stature as exemplified by landmark shows such as “The Sopranos”, “Game of Thrones” and “Breaking Bad”. Will too much TV eventually spell its own demise? This course will examine the historical evolution, aesthetic opportunities and technological dynamics that have fueled television’s ascendency into this new Golden Era. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Screenwriting

FILM S350 (CRN: 30093)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. This course will look at the screenplay as both a literary text and blue-print for production. Several classic screenplays will be analyzed. Students will then embark on pitching, outlining and writing their own scripts. We will intensively focus on character development, creating "cinematic" dialogue, plot construction, conflict, pacing, dramatic foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext and visual story-telling. Several classic and contemporary films will first be read and then screened for analysis and discussion. (Psycho, Chinatown, Blade Runner, Winter's Bone, The Devil Wears Prada, The Social Network). Students will learn professional screenplay format and write an 8-12 page screenplay that will be read aloud in class and critiqued. Enrollment limited to 15. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Intermediate and Advanced French I

FREN S130 (CRN: 30244)

Online Course. Intensive first course for second-year language students designed to develop students' proficiency in the four language skill areas. Prepares students for further work in literary, language, and cultural studies, as well as for nonacademic use of French. Oral communication skills, writing practice, vocabulary expansion, and a comprehensive review of fundamental grammatical structures are integrated with the study of short stories, novels, and films. Conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 120 (Elementary and Intermediate French II), FREN 121 (Intermediate French) or equivalent proficiency. Enrollment limited to 15 students.  1.5 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Intermediate and Advanced French II

FREN S140 (CRN: 30245)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Intensive second course for second-year language students designed to develop students' proficiency in the four language skill areas. Introduction of more complex grammatical structures. Films and other authentic media accompany literary readings from throughout the francophone world, culminating with the reading of a longer novel and in-class presentation of student research projects. Conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 130 (Intermediate and Advanced French I) or equivalent proficiency. Enrollment limited to 15 students. 1.5 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Advanced Language Practice

FREN S150 (CRN: 30246)

Online Course. An intensive advanced language course intended to improve students' comprehension of spoken and written French as well as their speaking and writing skills. Modern fiction and nonfiction texts familiarize students with idiomatic French. Special attention to grammar review and vocabulary acquisition. Conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 140 (Intermediate and Advanced French II), FREN 145 (Intensive Intermediate and Advanced French), or equivalent proficiency. Conducted entirely in French. Enrollment limited to 15 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Age of Cathedrals

FREN S304 (CRN: 30252)

Course cancelled. Online Course.A study of the great Gothic cathedrals of the High Middle Ages in France—Saint Denis, Notre Dame Paris, Chartres, Sainte Chapelle, Amiens, Reims--in the context of historical, literary, and philosophical works by Peter Abelard, Abbot Suger, Rutebeuf, Saint Bernard, Joinville, Thibaut de Champagne, Pseudo-Dionysius, Marie de France, James of Voragine, Guibert de Nogent, and the anonymous Song of Roland, fabliaux, and courtly lyric. Core consideration of gothic design (structure, sculpture, stained glass), urban and economic renewal, and intellectual, social, and religious life of twelfth- and thirteenth-century France. Conducted in English. Applicants choose FREN, HUMS, or LITR credit. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Belle Epoque France

FREN S367 (CRN: 30249)

Online Course. A study of important works of literature, painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and the decorative arts in turn-of-the-century France (1870-1914). This course will acquaint students with the principal literary and artistic forms, social trends, political movements, scientific theories, and technological innovations of the Belle Époque, with special attention to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Art Nouveau, Dadaism, Cubism and authors Émile Zola, André Gide, Marcel Proust, Guillaume Apollinaire, Guy de Maupassant, Stéphane Mallarmé, Colette, Henri Alain-Fournier, Jules Barbey d’Aurevilly, and Georges Feydeau. Conducted in English. Applicants choose FREN, HUMS, or LITR credit. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

French for Reading

FREN S999E (CRN: 30191)

Online Course. Students acquire skills for reading French-language texts of any difficulty with some fluency. Study of syntax and grammar; practice in close reading and translation of texts in different genres in the humanities. These courses do not have live online class meetings and will not appear on transcripts issued by the University. The course work is not self-paced as there are weekly assignment deadlines. Yale doctoral student tuition is funded by GSAS. Visiting student tuition: $850. Technology Fee: $85. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Human Rights and Humanitarian Crises in the 20th Century

GLBL S256 (CRN: 30310)

Online Course. This course introduces students to the central debates around human rights and humanitarian responses in the second half of the twentieth century. The central themes of our course are human rights, humanitarian aid, and international responses to genocide. We will analyze canonical questions about when international responses to humanitarian crises are merited and how they should be carried out. We will trace the intellectual history of debates on just and unjust wars, international human rights enforcement, and the role of morality in the post-World War II World Order. Case studies will include: Vietnam, Biafra, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Rwanda, and Bosnia. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

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