Career Strategy Fellowships Study Abroad Summer Session MyYSS

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Experience a Course with Yale in the Summer

Studying at Yale gives students a newfound appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Some courses have pre-requisites.  To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course. If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students. Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session

Pin: Course Syllabi

2022 course syllabi will begin to be posted in March. You may use the below list of syllabi from last summer as a reference. 

2021 Course Syllabi

Summer 2021 Courses 

Note: Summer 2022 Courses will be posted by mid-January. Please use the 2021 course list below for a good idea of the breadth and types of courses that will likely be offered in 2022.

Use the search function below to view courses offered online. 

Please review important information about online courses.

Summer 2022 Dates

Date: Session A:
May 30 - July 1, 2022

Session B:
July 4 - August 5, 2022

Introduction to International Relations

GLBL S268E (CRN: 30171)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Survey of key debates and concepts in international relations. Exploration of historical and contemporary issues using Western and non-Western cases and evidence. Topics include the rise of states; causes, conduct, and outcomes of wars; the emergence of new actors and forms of conflict; and evolution of global economy. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

International Security

GLBL S275E (CRN: 30340)

Course cancelled. Online Course. This course introduces students to the main theories and issues in international security. The focus is both theoretical and analytical. The course aims at providing students with the fundamental tools necessary to understand basic problems in international security now and in the future. We will cover the basic approaches to the study of international security -- realism, liberalism, and constructivism -- and then explore key topics in international security including: the roots of competition and cooperation among states; the causes of war; the sources of military effectiveness; the effects of nuclear weapons on world politics; the dynamics of international crises; the rise of China; and U.S. grand strategy. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

Disinformation and Democracy

GLBL S343E (CRN: 30160)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. This course explores the evolution of information warfare as a national security threat to the United States. Beginning with the KGB’s use of “active measures” during the Cold War, the course looks at how propaganda and disinformation campaigns became central to the Putin regime and how social media has facilitated their expansion and impact. Using Russia’s efforts in the 2016 election as an example, students will examine how the First Amendment places limitations on the U.S.’s ability to counter such operations in the United States and explore how strengthening critical thinking and American social capital might be effective prophylactics against these efforts. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.  (View syllabus)

Intermediate German I

GMAN S130 (CRN: 30247)

Online Course. Intensive first course for second-year language students. A content- and task-based course that helps students improve their oral and written linguistic skills and their cultural awareness through a variety of materials related to German literature, culture, history, and politics. Course materials include authentic readings, a feature film, and shorter video clips. Prerequisite: GMAN 120 (Elementary German II) or equivalent proficiency. Enrollment limited to 15 students. 1.5 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Intermediate German II

GMAN S140 (CRN: 30248)

Online Course. Intensive second course for second-year language students. A content- and task-based course that helps students improve their oral and written linguistic skills and their cultural awareness through a variety of materials related to German literature, culture, history, and politics. Course materials include authentic readings, a feature film, and shorter video clips. Prerequisite: GMAN 130 (Intermediate German I) or equivalent proficiency. Enrollment limited to 15 students. 1.5 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

The Logic of Dreams

GMAN S190 (CRN: 30094)

Online Course. The nature, history, and possible meanings of dream experience, with reference to Sigmund Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. Works from film and literature about dreams and dreaming, as well as major texts in dream theory. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85.  Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

German for Reading

GMAN S999E (CRN: 30192)

Online Course. Students acquire skills for reading German-language texts of any difficulty with some fluency. Study of syntax and grammar; practice in close reading and translation of texts in different genres in the humanities. These courses do not have live online class meetings and will not appear on transcripts issued by the University. The course work is not self-paced as there are weekly assignment deadlines. Yale doctoral student tuition is funded by GSAS. Visiting student tuition: $850. Technology Fee: $85. Session B: July 12 - August 13.

Confronting Jim Crow in the Age of Fascism

HIST S126 (CRN: 30307)

Online Course. This seminar situates the twentieth century struggle for African American civil and human rights within the global age of fascism. Considers activist responses to fascist governments, ideologies, and tendencies in the 1930s and 1940s and the legacies and resurgent memories of fascism in the United States in subsequent decades. Drawing from a broad array of scholarship, we examine how a framework of antifascism within the black freedom struggle served to critique and combat racism and racial hierarchy, Jim Crow segregation, right-wing social movements, demagoguery, militarism, imperialism, and other more insidious forms of white supremacist state violence. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

The History of US-Latin American Relations

HIST S136 (CRN: 30308)

Online Course. This course examines the history of the United States’ relationship with Latin America and the Caribbean from the end of the nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth (with sustained discussion on connections to the present day). We will examine inter-American relations through lenses such as culture, gender and sexuality, politics, economics, and diplomatic history. Topics include the Monroe Doctrine; the War of 1898; racial capitalism; US military interventions; the Panama Canal; the Guatemalan, Cuban, and Chilean Revolutions; and US-backed counterrevolution through coups, paramilitary warfare, and counterinsurgency training. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Film, Video, and American History

HIST S187 (CRN: 30091)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. This course looks at American history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries through the lens of film and video. Students will learn to analyze fiction and nonfiction moving pictures in the context of social and cultural history. Emphasis will be placed on using films and videos as historical sources. Topics will include: The Great Migration, The Jazz Age, the Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, September 11th, and contemporary activist movements. Screenings will include feature films such as Within Our Gates, Sullivan’s Travels, Casablanca, Night of the Living Dead, and Selma. This course seeks to expand students' knowledge of the history of American film, culture, and society. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

The Rise of the West: Intellectual History

HIST S216 (CRN: 30341)

Online Course. The course will provide a survey of the intellectual history of the "Western Civilization" from its roots in ancient Greece and Rome through the 16th century. The course will specifically track the development of the ideas that defined, justified, and regulated the relationship of an individual both to their communities, either secular or spiritual, and the outsiders. Throughout the course, students will familiarize themselves with the ideas of "just war," state and politics, the role of education and philosophy in shaping the Western intellectual milestones such as the birth of Christianity, the Renaissance, and the Reformation. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Society and Politics of North Africa

HIST S235 (CRN: 30270)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. The Maghrib – Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya – has historically been a critical frontier zone linking Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. This crossroads remains strategically important with issues such as sub-Saharan and North African migration, political Islam, Arab-Berber identities, terrorism and counter-terrorism, the Sahara question, and Mediterranean trade relationships current international concerns. This course provides a thorough overview of North African history, the legacies of colonialism and nationalism, political systems and opposition, Islam in North Africa, and the Maghrib in the 21st century. Applicants choose AFST, GLBL, HIST, MMES, or SOCY credit. Prerequisite: None. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

The Olympic Games: Ancient to Modern

HIST S242 (CRN: 30215)

Online Course. Introduction to the history of the Olympic Games from antiquity to the present. The mythology of athletic events in ancient Greece and the ritual, political, and social ramifications of the actual competitions. The revival of the modern Olympic movement in 1896, the political investment of the Greek state at the time, and specific games as they illustrate the convergence of athletic cultures and sociopolitical transformations in the twentieth century. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Human Rights and Humanitarian Catastrophes in the 20th Century

HIST S265 (CRN: 30309)

Online Course. This course introduces students to the central debates around human rights and humanitarian responses in the second half of the twentieth century. The central themes of our course are human rights, humanitarian aid, and international responses to genocide. We will analyze canonical questions about when international responses to humanitarian crises are merited and how they should be carried out. We will trace the intellectual history of debates on just and unjust wars, international human rights enforcement, and the role of morality in the post-World War II World Order. Case studies will include: Vietnam, Biafra, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Rwanda, and Bosnia. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Global Health Across Audiences: Research and Communication

HLTH S367 (CRN: 30367)

Course Cancelled. Online Course. The COVID-19 pandemic exposed a tragic disconnect between the science of global health research and the communication of scientific findings to policymakers, the general public, and scientists in other fields. Global Health Across Audiences specifically addresses this concern by exploring the intersection of academic research and public health communication. Using contemporary global health issues, students learn key scientific principles of public health and epidemiological research and then discover how to translate these principles to various scientific, semi-scientific, and non-scientific audiences. It trains students on the methods and dynamics of communicating scientific findings using a variety of mediums and genres tailored for specific audiences, including narratives, op-eds, storytelling, interviews, online platforms, filmmaking, and others, to clearly and effectively communicate global health research. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

History of Art: Renaissance to Present

HSAR S114 (CRN: 30097)

Online course. Global survey of selected arts from the Renaissance to the present. Form as meaning in painting, prints, photography, architecture, and the early moving image. Skills in visual analysis and art historical research. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Classicism and its Controversies

HSAR S207E (CRN: 30162)

Online Course. Explores the ways that classical antiquity has impacted the modern artistic and political imagination. Topics of discussion will include representations of the body, expressions of political authority, and debates about cultural patrimony across time, place, and medium; (mis)understandings of classical sculpture, including its supposed white surface, and their impact on ideas about race and morality; the invocation of Greco-Roman models of government from Revolutionary America to Nazi Germany; and the role of classical ideals in shaping modern-day arguments about cultural patrimony. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Art Since 1945

HSAR S223 (CRN: 30099)

Online Course. This course surveys the major global modern art movements from 1945 to the present. Topics include abstraction, pop art, minimalism, video installations, performance, conceptualism, land art, appropriation, and institutional critique. The works of prominent artists will be examined within their broader historical, political, and social contexts. Emphasis is placed upon the intersections between artistic practice and issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality. Students will be introduced to various methodologies employed by art historians, particularly close visual analysis. Seminar discussions make extensive use of the collections in the Yale University Art Gallery and Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

“Selfies”: Depicting the Self, 1500 to the Present Day

HSAR S284 (CRN: 30312)

Course Cancelled. Online Course. What does it mean to picture the self? This course will look at the long history of artistic representations of the self in western art before and after photography. We’ll explore the selfie as a uniquely modern form of self-expression, economized self-promotion, and political subversion at the same time that we consider its roots in the broader history of self-portraiture in the arts. Spanning a period bracketed by contemporary artist selfies on one hand and Albrecht Dürer’s 1500 self-portrait on the other, we’ll consider how artists have historically framed and pictured the self in painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts. This course will draw on objects from the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art as well as from major art collections worldwide. At the same time, we’ll explore self-representation on social media outlets such as Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok. In examining depictions of the self across such varied media, we’ll determine how notions of self-presentation in the arts intersect with questions of individualism, identity, commodity culture, and self-promotion from 1500 to today. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9.

The Nature of Genius

HUMS S210E (CRN: 30168)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. What is genius? Is it relative or absolute, the product of an individual or a culture? What role do gender, race, and class play? What are the essential drivers of exceptional individual accomplishment? Can genius be self-taught? Possible answers to these questions will emerge through an examination of the lives of Leonardo, Newton, Einstein, Mozart, Woolf, Curie, Picasso, Gandhi, Lady Gaga, and Kanye West. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

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