Career Strategy Fellowships Study Abroad Summer Session MyYSS

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Experience a Course with Yale in the Summer

Studying at Yale gives students a newfound appreciation for their academics and forges friendships that will last a lifetime.  Students come to Yale Summer Session to:

  • earn credit toward their major and fulfill requirements for their degree
  • explore a new field or topic
  • focus intensely on one particular subject
  • study with Yale faculty
  • prepare for the challenges of highly selective colleges

Tip: Choosing a Yale Summer Session Course

  • Some courses have pre-requisites.  To enroll, your transcript must show that you have the met the pre-requisite(s).
  • Course numbers do not necessarily indicate the level of the course. If a course has no pre-requisites, it is open to any student.
  • Some courses are not open to high school students. Check course descriptions.
  • There is a two course limit per session

Pin: Course Syllabi

2022 course syllabi will begin to be posted in March. You may use the below list of syllabi from last summer as a reference. 

2021 Course Syllabi

Summer 2021 Courses 

Note: Summer 2022 Courses will be posted by mid-January. Please use the 2021 course list below for a good idea of the breadth and types of courses that will likely be offered in 2022.

Use the search function below to view courses offered online. 

Please review important information about online courses.

Summer 2022 Dates

Date: Session A:
May 30 - July 1, 2022

Session B:
July 4 - August 5, 2022

Intermediate Modern Chinese I

CHNS S130 (CRN: 30294)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. An intermediate course that continues intensive training in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and consolidates achievements from the first year of study. Students improve oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge both reading and writing vocabulary. Students will also gain knowledge and understanding of Chinese culture. To be taken after CHNS 120. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1.5 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Intermediate Modern Chinese II

CHNS S140 (CRN: 30295)

Online Course. Continuation of CHNS S130. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1.5 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Classical Mythologies

CLCV S115 (CRN: 30051)

Online Course. A study of the mythological stories of Greek and Roman gods and heroes. The literary forms and historical contexts of classical mythologies will be studied, along with the reception of these myths in various media (including painting, music, and film). Emphasis will be placed on the uses and meanings of myth in culture. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

The Olympic Games: Ancient to Modern

CLCV S319 (CRN: 30199)

Online Course. Introduction to the history of the Olympic Games from antiquity to the present. The mythology of athletic events in ancient Greece and the ritual, political, and social ramifications of the actual competitions. The revival of the modern Olympic movement in 1896, the political investment of the Greek state at the time, and specific games as they illustrate the convergence of athletic cultures and sociopolitical transformations in the twentieth century. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Ancient Empires

CLCV S419 (CRN: 30120)

Online Course. Introduction to the history and cultures of the ancient empires of the Near East (Middle East), focusing on the period from the Assyrian and Persian Empires to the establishment of Islam (ca 900 BCE–ca 750 CE). Use of ancient primary sources critically to create a historical narrative and to understand the modern appropriation of ancient history for political and other purposes. An introduction to the geography of southwestern Asia and a survey of languages, Iranian and other religions, and some ancient literature from a variety of cultures. Events covered in this course contributed decisively to the demography of the present-day Near East and the social characteristics of its people, from the distribution of language communities to the variety of Near Eastern religions. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Computing and Programming

CPSC S100 (CRN: 30054)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Introduction to the intellectual enterprises of computer science and to the art of programming. Students learn how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently. Topics include abstraction, algorithms, data structures, encapsulation, resource management, security, software engineering, and web development. Languages include C, Python, SQL, and JavaScript, plus CSS and HTML. Problem sets inspired by real-world domains of biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, and gaming. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Programming

CPSC S112 (CRN: 30285)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Development on the computer of programming skills, problem-solving methods, and selected applications. No previous experience with computers necessary. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Full-Stack Web Development

CPSC S115 (CRN: 30022)

Online Course. Students develop a foundation of programming fundamentals, through Web development using Ruby and Javascript. Students will work with APIs (Application Programming Interfaces), understand the basic concepts of object-oriented programming, become proficient in database modeling and ORM (Object Relational Mapping), apply the MVC (Model View Controller) Framework, and execute full application development lifecycle. For college students and beyond. 2 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $8,800. Session A and B: June 7 - August 13.

A Practical Approach to Directing

DIR S997 (CRN: 30281)

Online Course. Designed to introduce practical tools for directing, this course applies to anyone who is interested in working on technique as a director, whether as a career, for teachers directing a school play, or for community theater productions. Topics include dramaturgy, script analysis, the director's work with the script, working with the actor, voice and speech techniques, and stage management organization. No formal training in directing necessary. Applicants should include a brief statement describing their background and areas of interest in their application. A transcript is not required. Limited housing is available for this course; contact Yale Summer Session at 203.432.2430 for details. Students must be available from 9:00 am to 10:00 pm Monday through Friday as well as Saturday afternoons and evenings and Sunday morning and afternoon. This intense course requires a full commitment of the student's time. The faculty reserves the right to add, extend, or adjust scheduled hours to accommodate the progress of the class. For college students and beyond. Application Deadline: May 1. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Tuition: $950. Technology Fee: $85. Dates: July 15 - July 24. (View syllabus)

Yale Summer Conservatory for Actors

DRMA S001 (CRN: 30055)

Online Course. Exploration and development of the fundamentals of the actor's craft based on the principles of Stanislavski. The course is a concise training program in which each student takes more than one class. The classes are in the following areas: (1) play analysis class, to understand what is to be acted; (2) acting class, to learn the application of basic acting techniques; (3) vocal production class, to improve vocal and articulation skills; (4) improvisation and mask class, to help free the imagination and to build confidence in spontaneous self-expression; (5)clowning class, to encourage the use of the face for emotional expression; and (6) scene study class, to understand how the classes listed above come together when working on a scene. The instructors constitute a teaching staff of working professionals and are assisted by teaching associates giving the students individual attention. The summer drama program requires a full commitment of the student's time. Classes are held in the mornings, afternoons, and two evenings each week, Monday through Friday, with 26 to 28 classroom hours each week, plus additional hours for individual tutorials and scheduled rehearsal time. Extra evening and Saturday morning sessions may be scheduled for group activities and additional classes. A single grade will be awarded for the course. Enrollment is limited. Complete applications must include a resume of relevant experience and a letter of recommendation from a drama teacher or other theater professional. Application deadline: May 1. 2 Credits. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $8,800. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Human Osteology

E&EB S464 (CRN: 30031)

Online Course. A lecture and laboratory course focusing on the characteristics of the human skeleton and its use in studies of functional morphology, paleodemography, and paleopathology. Laboratories familiarize students with skeletal parts; lectures focus on the nature of bone tissue, its biomechanical modification, sexing, aging, and interpretation of lesions. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Chinese Cinema Survey: 1980–Present

EALL S258 (CRN: 30056)

Online Course. Surveys key figures, movements, and trends in Sinophone cinema since 1980. Sessions will be structured around ten films, each an entry point into a broader topic, such as the Fifth and Sixth Generation directors; the Hong Kong New Wave; Taiwan New Cinema; martial arts film; commercial blockbuster; and independent documentary. Directors of interest include Jia Zhangke, Zhang Yimou, Ang Lee, Wong Kar-Wai, Ann Hui, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Tsai Ming-Liang, Ou Ning, and Feng Xiaogang. We will examine their films formally, through shot-by-shot analysis, as well as in relation to major social, political, and economic developments in recent Chinese history. We will also consider pertinent questions of propaganda and censorship; aesthetics and politics; history and memory; transnational networks and audiences; and what constitutes "Chineseness" in a globalized world. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Humanities in Tokyo

EALL S362 (CRN: 30243)

Online Course. Surveys the cultural history of Tokyo through literature, film, art, anime and architecture and living spaces. Starting with the heyday of Edo when the city lent its name not only to the shogun’s capital, already a thriving urban center of over a million inhabitants, but to the historical period itself (1604-1868), we will examine the city’s reincarnation as the imperial metropolis of Tokyo in the Meiji period (1868-1912), the phoenix-like cycles of destruction and reconstruction through the Great Kanto Earthquake (1923), the firebombing of the city during WWII and other significant changes in the topography and lived experiences of the city. Enrollment limited to 17 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Microeconomics

ECON S115E (CRN: 30149)

Course Closed to further enrollment in both sessions. Online Course. Introduction to the principles of microeconomics, supply and demand, consumer theory, and competitive markets. Applications to contemporary policy issues such as rent control, minimum wage, antitrust policy, pollution, and income inequality. For college students and beyond. May not be taken after ECON 108 or 110. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Audit Option. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Offered in Session A: June  7 - July 9 and Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Microeconomics

ECON S115E (CRN: 30151)

Course Closed to further enrollment in both sessions. Online Course. Introduction to the principles of microeconomics, supply and demand, consumer theory, and competitive markets. Applications to contemporary policy issues such as rent control, minimum wage, antitrust policy, pollution, and income inequality. For college students and beyond. May not be taken after ECON 108 or 110. Enrollment limited to 30 students. Audit Option. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Offered in Session A: June  7 - July 9 and Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Macroeconomics

ECON S116E (CRN: 30152)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. An introduction to basic macroeconomic concepts and theories, such as national income accounting, theories of growth, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, banking, finance, and economic crises, with special emphasis on the recent financial crisis. Prerequisite: ECON 108, 110, 115 or equivalent. For college students and beyond. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Offered in Session A: June  7 - July 9 and Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Macroeconomics

ECON S116E (CRN: 30153)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. An introduction to basic macroeconomic concepts and theories, such as national income accounting, theories of growth, inflation, unemployment, business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, banking, finance, and economic crises, with special emphasis on the recent financial crisis. Prerequisite: ECON 108, 110, 115 or equivalent. For college students and beyond. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Offered in Session A: June  7 - July 9 and Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Data Analysis and Econometrics

ECON S117 (CRN: 30296)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Introduction to data analysis from the beginning of the econometrics sequence; exposure to modern empirical economics; and development of credible economic analysis. This course emphasizes working directly and early with data, through such economic examples as studies of environmental/natural resource economics, intergenerational mobility, discrimination, and finance. Topics include: probability, statistics, and sampling; selection, causation and causal inference; regression and model specification; and machine learning and big data. Prerequisites: ECON 108, 110, 115, or equivalent and familiarity with single variable calculus. Students who have taken ECON 131 may not receive major credit for this course. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session B: July 12 - August 13. (View syllabus)

Introduction to Data Analysis and Econometrics

ECON S117E (CRN: 30297)

Course closed to further enrollment. Online Course. Introduction to data analysis from the beginning of the econometrics sequence; exposure to modern empirical economics; and development of credible economic analysis. This course emphasizes working directly and early with data, through such economic examples as studies of environmental/natural resource economics, intergenerational mobility, discrimination, and finance. Topics include: probability, statistics, and sampling; selection, causation and causal inference; regression and model specification; and machine learning and big data. Prerequisites: ECON 108, 110, 115, or equivalent and familiarity with single variable calculus. Students who have taken ECON 131 may not receive major credit for this course. Enrollment limited to 20 students. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

Intermediate Microeconomics

ECON S121 (CRN: 30344)

Online Course. The theory of resource allocation and its applications. Topics include the theory of choice, consumer and firm behavior, production, price determination in different market structures, welfare, and market failure. After introductory microeconomics and completion of the mathematics requirement for the major or its equivalent. Elementary techniques from multivariate calculus are introduced and applied, but prior knowledge is not assumed. May not be taken after ECON 125. 1 Credit. Technology Fee: $85. Tuition: $4,500. Session A: June 7 - July 9. (View syllabus)

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